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Will Smith Explains Why He Turned Down The “Neo” Role In The Matrix

In the closing days of 1999, much of the globe was weary about the potential hazards of Y2K. The technological scare was real, as valid experts, computer experts, and programmers clamored with the fear that all computerized machines would stop working at the end of December 31, 1999. This widespread panic of potentially catastrophic events was the perfect storm for two talented writer/filmmakers, The Wachowskis, Lana and Lilly. On March 31, 1999, their Sci-Fi/Action film, The Matrix, was released to theaters. At a time when machines were thought to be potentially responsible for a crumbling society, the film starring Keanu Reeves and Laurence Fishburne about a futuristic simulated reality was full of symbolism. Will Smith Gives 1 Of His Realest Interviews. He Says He’s Finally Being Authentic (Video) The Matrix, which morphed into a trilogy of movies followed by, The Matrix Reloaded and The Matrix Revolutions, would go on to gross over $460 million worldwide and win four Oscar awards. The franchise put plot points and language into the global lexicon. It also introduced legions of viewers to some of the best filmmaking in the Sci-Fi canon. For an actor who had already starred in several major films, it offered a benchmark role for Keanu Reeves, who played “Neo.” However, part of the reason that the actor from Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure, Speed, and Point Break may have gotten the role, is because Will Smith turned down some very serious interest. For his “Storytime” video series, Will Smith explains his reasoning for declining. Smith was on a career winning streak in ’96. Smith’s name found its way onto many people’s tongues in both TV and film for his role in NBC’s The Fresh Prince Of Bel-Air, and smash movies like Bad Boys and Independence Day. Smith explains, “That was a crazy time in my life. It was like however I threw the ball, it was going in.” Will Smith Reacts To The 65′ Mural Of Him Made For A West Philadelphia School (Video) His fame accrued Smith a lot of attention, and as a result, he was turning down future blockbusters left and right. “I had done Independence Day the year before. So I was like I don’t want to do another alien movie. I don’t want to be the alien movie guy. So, I turned down Men In Black.” But not everyone in his circle agreed with his decisions. Smith digresses, “And Steven Spielberg called me. He was producing. He said, ‘Why you turning down the movie?” I was like, ‘You know, I don’t wanna be the alien guy.’ He said, ‘Um, do me a favor. Don’t use your brain for this one. Use my brain.’ He was so serious, that I was like, ‘Aight, he did do Jaws.’ For those who feel like such an incredibly popular, big-budget film like The Matrix would be difficult to turn down, Smith explains his reasoning. But, he’s not exactly happy about it. Will continues, “[You know] when you get that universal energy and nothing can go wrong. Then the other side comes, and you can’t do nothin’ right.” Will Smith Reminds Jaden Who The FIRST Icon In The Family Was With A New Freestyle (Video) After reluctantly making Men In Black, which became a nearly $600 million hit in its own right, the Wachowski brothers came to Smith in 1998 to pitch him for the role of Neo. Smith expounds, “They came in, and they made a pitch for The Matrix, and as it turns out, they’re geniuses. But, there’s a fine line in a pitch meeting between ‘genius’ and what I experienced in the meeting.” Will then goes on to explain the Wachowski’s stereotypical “surfer dude”-stylized speech. Acting as if he were one of the [Wachowski’s], Smith delivers in jest, “‘So dude, we’re thinking, like, like imagine you’re in a fight and then you, like, jump. Imagine if you could stop jumping, in the middle of the jump… But then, people could see around you, 360 [degrees], while you’re stopped jumping. Right? And then, we’re going to invent these cameras. And then, people can see the whole jump while you’re stopped in the middle of the jump.'” Smith finishes his story with precision comedic timing, “So I made Wild Wild West; I’m not proud of it.” Despite its #1 theme song with Kool Moe Dee and Dru Hill, that film did not have nearly the impact of The Matrix. Will Smith Says “The Beast Is Back” & Rips A New Freestyle (Video) The Fresh Prince keeps up the comedy, later revealing who else was going to star beside him in the film before he turned it down. “Keanu was perfect. Laurence Fishburne was perfect. If I had done it, because I’m Black, then ‘Morpheus’ wouldn’t have been Black, ’cause they was [also] looking at Val Kilmer. Val Kilmer was gonna be ‘Morpheus.’ So, I probably would’ve messed The Matrix up. I would’ve ruined it. So, I did y’all a favor.” Will Smith is coming up on a big year in 2019. This year, he will be featured in three films, including Disney’s reboot of Aladdin, the animated spy comedy, Spies In Disguise, and yet another Sci-Fi film with Ang Lee’s, Gemini Man. Smith is also in production for Bad Boys for Life, the third film in the buddy-cop comedy series alongside castmate Martin Lawrence.

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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King Diego – Ego Trip (Video)

Queens representative and Hip Hop head King Diego has dropped off the accompanying visual for his lead track for the new year, Ego Trip.

 

Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Earl Sweatshirt’s New Album Spells DOOM For His Generation (Video)

Late in 2018, Earl Sweatshirt released his fourth album, simply-titled Some Rap Songs. The LP showcases Earl’s sharp wordplay and conversational delivery. Moreover, the 24-year-old also shows that he is evolving as a producer. He favors carefully-crafted loops instead of the kind of grabby production that can detract from the lyrics. In many ways, Earl continues to show that he is writing his own chapter while taking a page or two out of the MF DOOM playbook. Both artists have addressed personal losses in their art. Between KMD’s Black Bastards and Operation Doomsday, DOOM lost his brother, Subroc. He dealt with the pain through reinvention, both as a writer and a producer. Years later, the music that the brass at KMD’s label seemed hesitant to release appeared to be wildly ahead of its time. This also may be true of Earl, a year after losing his father and reportedly on his way out from his deal. Step Inside The Mind of Earl Sweatshirt With A Wildly Diverse DJ Set (Video) In conjunction with the Tan Cressida/Columbia Records release, the double-threat born Thebe Kgositsile released an eight-minute film co-written and co-directed by Terence Nance and Naima Ramos-Chapman of HBO’s Random Acts Of Flyness. That visual work, Nowhere, Nobody complements the project, serving as both a visual companion and also a worthy entry point, given that six songs are featured. It features scenes self-narrated by the Los Angeles, California-based artist lyrical lever, intertwined with a brief biography of his late father, South African poet Bra Willie. Several songs of the album play against humble scenes engulfed with the kind of artistic confusion that only Earl Sweatshirt can deliver. The opening sequence finds Sweatshirt enthusiastically coaching a youth basketball team. The video eerily floats through scenes of Thebe deconstructing art pieces. The album’s opening track, “Shattered Dreams,” serves as the soundtrack as still sculptures of the heads and torsos of Black women and men mirrored with their live counterparts are gently brushed of vines and wiped clear of debris by the son of the fallen poet. The short film continues with Thebe resting still in a bath tub, after being wiped down by a woman. The video concludes with the scene switching to Earl delivering the album intro with captured shots of blood seeping through the ceiling. The power of Kgositsile’s lyrics rumble the room of the rapper in an alternate dimension, causing a picture of a young Thebe and his father to fall and shatter. After the recitation of “Shattered Dreams,” the short film comes to an end with a round of applause visualized by a scene of a white casket filled with sculptures of severed hands draped with the flag of South Africa, an inventive funeral march for the respected Keorapetse Kgositsile. Poet Keorapetse Kgositsile, Earl Sweatshirt’s Father, Has Died Although DOOM has never been one to get quite so deep with the visuals, the listening aesthetics are similar. These are both artists out of innovative groups early in their career. Each has been disenchanted with the label system and searched for the space to make Hip-Hop on their terms, without distractions or gimmicks. Take “Nowhere2Go,” one of the songs featured. Earl’s word choices and contrasts are not unlike the Masked Villain. “Even when I hit a low / I still give thanks to the Most High / I can’t do favors no more / If you lame and you broke, and you waiting for co-sign / I take a plate to go / Bread I could break with bro / Noose on my chain is gold / Tell me how you been faking the whole time? / That’s a surveiller’s goal / These ni**as be playing for both sides.” The intricate rhyme pattern, compound bars, and effortless delivery complete the comparison. Some Rap Songs is filled with these illustrations. Earl Sweatshirt is an industry outcast, who channels pain, loss, and indifference into making some incredible Hip-Hop. This 2003 Conversation With MF DOOM Is The Interview Of His Career #BonusBeat: Earl Sweatshirt’s 2019 tour dates: 03-23 New Orleans, LA – BUKU Music + Art Project 03-25 Charlotte, NC – The Underground at the Fillmore Charlotte 03-26 Silver Spring, MD – The Fillmore Silver Spring 03-28 Baltimore, MD – Baltimore Soundstage 03-29 Philadelphia, PA – Theatre of Living Arts 03-30 New York, NY – Irving Plaza 03-31 Providence, RI – Fête Music Hall 04-02 Boston, MA – Paradise Rock Club 04-04 Montreal, Quebec – Corona Theatre 04-05 Toronto, Ontario – The Phoenix Concert Theatre 04-07 Detroit, MI – Saint Andrews Hall 04-09 Minneapolis, MN – Cabooze 04-10 Lawrence, KS – The Granada 04-11 Denver, CO – Cervantes Masterpiece 04-14 Seattle, WA – The Showbox 04-15 Vancouver, British Columbia – The Commodore Ballroom 04-16 Portland OR – Crystal Ballroom 04-18 Sacramento, CA – Ace of Spades 04-19 San Francisco, CA – Regency Ballroom 04-20 Santa Cruz, CA – The Catalyst 04-21 San Luis Obispo, CA – Fremont Theater 04-23 Pomona, CA – The Glass House 04-24 Los Angeles, CA – The Novo 04-26 Las Vegas, NV – Vinyl – Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Las Vegas 04-27 San Diego, CA – SOMA 04-28 Phoenix, AZ – Club Red 05-01 Austin, TX – Emo’s 05-02 Dallas, TX – Canton Hall 05-04 Houston, TX – Warehouse Live 05-05 Birmingham, AL – Saturn 05-06 Atlanta, GA – The Masquerade 06-07 London, England – Meridian Water (Field Day Festival 2019)

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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Slick Rick Tells The Stories Of His Jewelry Collection Piece By Piece (Video)

While Slick Rick is widely recognized as one of Rap’s greatest storytellers, he is also well known for his flamboyant jewelry. For more than 30 years, along with the eye-patch and colorful suits, the MC almost exclusively appears in specially-designed jewelry. Precious metals and jewels are on his fingers, around his wrists, in his teeth, and certainly around his neck. On Soul Train with Doug E. Fresh in the mid-1980s, Rick donned at least three gold rings to match his sunglasses. He was more draped up by 1988’s The Great Adventures Of Slick Rick cover art. It has been a growing part of Rick’s image ever since. However, behind the artwork, iconic photographs, and props is a real story of a collector with a vision for custom quality. Recently, Rick appeared in GQ’s “On The Rocks” video series. Right from the jump, The Ruler is honest and upfront about the history of Hip-Hop jewelry. “Back in the days, when rappers used to start off, we used to have to borrow the jewelry before we could purchase it. So, that’s why you hear a lot of rumors where they say, ‘You don’t own that. You don’t own this. You borrow it. Da da da.’ Back in the days you’d say that a lot,” admits Slick Rick. “But it was true. But it’s not a bad thing; it’s just you have to sell yourself like ‘Cinderella.’” Slick Rick Shares A 30-Year-Old Song That Missed His Great Adventure (Audio) Later in the piece, he follows up with a personal example, “This was one of my first bracelets. I got it from Jacob The Jeweler too. I used to borrow this from Jacob until I purchased it.” The famed Manhattan jeweler arranged a payment plan for the Def Jam Records artist. Throughout, Rick’s wisdom about jewelry is accessible, regardless of class. He admits several times to not having the means to get the pieces he desired. However, he found a way to save up and make a play. Rick also offers some tips to people who may want to get some flash on a budget. Ricky also explains where he thinks the notion to wear so much bling came from. “Well, I’ve been in this jewelry game for a minute. Since the very beginning. You know, the only people that were before people like me and Rakim and Eric B. and them cats, was like Mr. T. So, Mr. T was our role model, before us.” Besides the A-Team star, he also cites Sammy Davis, Jr. as another inspiration too, especially displaying rings while holding the microphone. Slick Rick’s Children’s Story To Be Re-Released As Actual Children’s Book Rick shows a ring in his collection that resembles one of his earliest purchases. “When you’d look at my first pictures, you’d always see me with one ring on, or a bracelet. I didn’t have all this stuff yet.” Rick also says that he often upgraded his pieces in size, but also taking pieces and later encrusting them with diamonds. He says that he has also “dipped” older rings, bracelets, and necklaces to rose or white gold tints. It gave them a freshness for changing trends. On one table is Rick’s more extravagant modern purchases. On the other surface are some relics from Rick’s ’80s and ’90s run. This style icon reasons that big, flashy pieces have always been popular in places like New York City because they stand out from a distance. They show success and flare. He runs through his bejeweled eye-patches, gaudy rings, and humongous medallions, including one gift from his wife. Although he has a gold plate with a diamond-studded “scales of justice” and another with a 3D scorpion, he asserts that he is neither a Libra or Scorpio, but instead a Capricorn. Two of these astrological pieces were alter after purchase. He says he bought the justice piece from a Chinatown storefront display after years of it sitting there idler. The Ruler says he believes it may have belonged to a drug dealer who was never able to come back for his custom medallion. From Geto Boy To Golfing Man: Scarface Takes The Course (Video) At one point, Slick Rick displays an iced-out watch that he uses when he’s mingling with the well-to-do. Asked by GQ if the rectangular-faced watch is the famed Cartier, Rick replies, “It’s a Bronx-ier,” with a laugh. He does show off a custom Rolex with added rings around it. This one is another Jacob creation. Rick shows some of his specific pieces from the ’80s, including a Mary plate with a ruby, and other medallions. Rick goes on to breakdown why you always have to be adding to your collection. “As time evolved, you gotta get bigger—as you can see. This is a style that came out later, which made this look tiny. You see what I’m saying? Now, you walking around like this and you ain’t getting no respect. So what? Yeah, give it to your girl,” he says with a chuckle. It is just one of several lighthearted moments in the vignette. Rick describes purchasing a special diamond ring set for he and his wife after returning home from prison in 1997. He says he saw Doug E. Fresh wearing a similar ring and knew that he had to step his game up. E-40 Is 1 Of Hip-Hop’s Smartest Hustlers. He Breaks Down His Businesses Beyond Rap Last year, Def Jam released some special 30th-anniversary merchandise tied to Rick’s debut. They also dropped some new songs from the Great Adventures sessions that did not make the cut. He also worked with Black Eyed Peas on their latest album. Recently, Rick also made a cameo in Nas’ NASIR mini-movie.

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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Just Blaze Reveals He Gave M.O.P. All Of Their Roc-A-Fella Beats

Just Blaze is the latest guest on Let The Record Show. The highly-respected producer tells hosts Mike Pizzo and Warren Peace about the personal significance of songs by Main Source, Nas, DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince, Genesis, and others, as they play on a turntable. At the end of the segment, the hosts play a few records that Just Blaze produced. One is the blue vinyl-Blueprint edition of 2001’s “U Don’t Know.” It is one of three songs Just laced on the #1 album, not including a hidden bonus song “Breathe Easy.” The records prompt the Patterson, New Jersey representative to talk about the Roc-A-Fella sessions and some mixing techniques behind the song. In doing so, he shares some cool news of sorts. The Blueprint: How 1 Kanye West Beat Tape Changed Roc-A-Fella Records Forever (Audio) “[JAY-Z’s] The Blueprint wasn’t planned,” says Blaze at around 41:00. “[Kanye West] had given Jay a few beats, then [JAY-Z] came to the studio one day, walked in on a Friday and was like, ‘Just, do you have any beats?’” He had grown up with Bobby Byrd’s I Need Help (Live On Stage) in his parents’ record crates. In 2001, Just had sampled “I’m Not To Blame” as something he considered building upon. At Jay’s request, he played the beat in its current state. “To me, this version was always a demo,” continues Just Blaze. “Because [JAY-Z] loved it so much we just went and ran with it.” The Roc record maker details how he felt about the construction of the beat, “I never flushed it out the way I wanted to…” Though he wasn’t all the way satisfied with the project, the opportunity to clean up the beat came a year later for The Blueprint 2: The Gift & The Curse‘s “U Don’t Know (Remix).” That version featured the newly-signed Roc-A-Fella artists M.O.P., who Jay had worked with previously. Oh Boy! Just Blaze Brings Out Unreleased Roc-A-Fella Goodies In A Radio Set (Mix) “When Jay got M.O.P. to be on the remix, it was [recorded to] the same beat,” says Just. However, it presented an opportunity. “I was like ‘If I get a chance to redo this, I’m doing in the way I really wanted to do it.’” Blaze got what he wished for and elaborates on the reconstruction of the Bobby Byrd sample. Referring to the original version, Just adds some technical information. “One of the hard things for me at that time was trying to figure out how do we get the horns to scream without interfering with [the rappers’] vocals.” He details how mix engineer Jason Goldstein suggested using a compression technique, sometimes used in House music. “Whenever Jay was rapping, we didn’t do a level compression; we did a frequency-based compression.” Using science and technology, the resulting mix allowed the beat to be boisterous, without ever eclipsing the song’s crystal-clear vocals. Big Daddy Kane Details Recording This 1988 Mixtape Collabo With JAY-Z (Video) DJ Warren Peace and Mike Pizzo ask Just more about Mash Out Posse’s short-lived tenure at the Roc. “So the funny thing is, we had half an album planned,” recalls the producer. “They picked the beats and everything, but nothing ever got vocal’d.” Just Blaze remained at Baseline Studios long after Roc-A-Fella’s founders had sold the company and parted ways. In closing down the sacred recording studio two years ago, Just says he found those beats that were set aside for Billy Danze and Lil Fame. “I found the folder of beats. ‘Cause when we closed Baseline, we made sure that we digitized everything. I tweeted, ‘Yo, I found the M.O.P. beat folder.'” M.O.P., Apathy & Celph Titled Warn They’ll Stomp Out Rappers Like Godzilla (Audio) Shortly after the tweet, Just was DJ’ing at his Mobile Mondays post in Lower Manhattan. He got a visit. “[Lil] Fame pulls up to Mobile Mondays like, ‘Yo, I heard you was gonna be here, and I heard you got a folder of beats.’ I had just bought the new Lambo’ that day,” he says of the Italian sports car. He took the MC/producer over to the expensive ride. “So we jump in the car, and I play him the folder. He took the whole folder, like, ‘Yo, we’re gonna make something out of this.’ I haven’t seen him since. But M.O.P. does have those beats now.” Just says that in the early 2000s, Fame and Bill never took the tracks home with them. “So they didn’t get those beats until 15 years later.” Just praises M.O.P.’s 2000 Warriorz album, the released they made just before signing with Roc-A-Fella. Just Blaze also discusses some other Roc relics. “There’s a whole [Memphis] Bleek and [Beanie Sigel] album no ones ever heard,” he reveals. “The State Property album came about because we were doing a Bleek and Beans album.” During the time of the collaborative album’s recording, Bleek’s brother was seriously injured in a car accident. “He wasn’t in the right mindset, but the studio was already booked,” explains Blaze, “So, State Property happened instead. That’s where ‘Roc The Mic’ came from.” In 2005, Beanie Sigel Teamed With Method Man & Heavy D For 1 Of His Realest Releases (Video) Elsewhere in the Let The Show conversation, Just Blaze reveals assembling a super-group of producers for Slaughterhouse’s unfinished Shady Records sophomore LP. He also explains how Genesis influenced his production on JAY-Z’s “Show Me What You Got.”

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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DMX Discusses Moving Forward With Drug Sobriety

Today (January 29), DMX gave one of his first interviews since leaving Gilmer Federal Correctional Institution in Glenville, West Virginia on Friday morning (January 24). The 48-year-old rapper was in California as a guest on Big Boy’s Neighborhood. The veteran radio and TV personality has released some clips from their conversation. Notably, DMX discussed his sobriety after a tax evasion sentence that began last March. At the time, a New York judge ordered that the rapper born Earl Simmons spend a year behind bars after he failed mandatory drug tests tied to previous charges. While X had remained at large to help pay back his tax debts, Jed Rakoff felt as though the former superstar needed the personal rehabilitation. Kurupt Explains How He & DMX Made Peace 20 Years After Their Beef Over Foxy Brown (Video) On Tuesday, X told Big Boy that he is not using drugs. “I don’t do anything,” DMX stated. “I’ll have a drink here and there. That was never a problem,” he says, repeating the second sentence. “That’s about it.” Big Boy asks the Ruff Ryders MC what the problem was. “Cocaine. Crack,” he says in a powerful clip. As Big Boy replies, X interrupts, “I think we kinda knew that was the problem. Anybody in here that didn’t know? Of course, it was a problem. I got in trouble and all that sh*t. It’s not worth it. I spent too much time doing things. It’s just not worth it.”

 

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#DMX speaks on overcoming addiction

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DMX also condemned Rap music that promotes some of the toxins that he is trying to overcome. “It all promotes drug use. If that’s what you want to do, that’s your business. But you ain’t gotta promote it like it’s cool, and make it cool. Then kids [are] walking around [saying], ‘I’m poppin’ Molly’s, I’m poppin’ Percs.’ Ayo.”

 

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#DMX says he feels hip hop is misrepresented right now and it’s all about drug use. #TheBigInterview

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Joe Budden Rips Future’s Mask Off For Lying About Lean DMX is currently under supervision for the next three years as he must reportedly pay back the IRS more than $2 million. Earlier this week, longtime DMX collaborator Swizz Beatz revealed that the newly-released MC plans to build on his music catalog.

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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Boogie & J.I.D. Reject Industry Gimmicks In Favor Of Real Rap

Last Friday, Compton’s Boogie released his first album since signing with Eminem’s Shady Records. The record is one of the better offerings so far in a young year, following a versatile—often humorous MC who looks at a dynamic life coming out of Hub City. Besides Marshall Mathers, the most notable guest on Everything’s For Sale is Dreamville’s J.I.D. Like Boogie (who was signed for a while before venturing to Shady), J.I.D. is another MC who is part of the Interscope Records system. Both artists tell their stories without compromise or gimmicks, and each did so before Em or J. Cole took interest. This year’s “Soho” looks at how each man’s career has shifted, and how they are past the industry jibber-jabber. Boogie Shows Why Eminem Signed Him With An Off The Top Freestyle (Video)I’m still a ni**a with needs, I need to get me a lease / Pass on the key to the streets / I need the key to the door that’s been blocking out my inner-peace,” Boogie raps, after waving off futile SoHo House meetings, social media stunts, and extensive entourages. J.I.D. follows, “Like the usual, know I ain’t meeting at Nobu / Or going for Sushi at Roku / I motherf*cking told you, I’m sick of these ni**as / Who wanna be all in the videos, in the photos / I think I should sign to Death Row though,” he spits, referencing Suge Knight’s famed 1995 Source Awards tirade. Method Man, Joey Bada$$ & J.I.D. Go Nuts On One Of 2018’s Best Collabos After grinding for years with Spillage Village, J.I.D. knows all too well the clout-chasers and fickle attention that comes with fame. In the video, both artists are groomed for the camera. Boogie is tested with different looks, which include missing an eye, braids and gold glasses and teeth. This may be a nod to check-writers and the public looking for another Fetty Wap or Migos. For his appearance, J.I.D.’s face is covered with bandage tape. Returning to Boogie for the third verse, he appears as a “Charlie doll” puppet, and then as somebody with skin that molds to every impression. This is an artful treatment on how the industry wants to shape its next stars. These two MCs have made their introductions and built their catalogs on talent. It is what got them their major co-signs and platforms. Earlier this month, Boogie released a video for “Silent Ride.” Last year, he dropped a visual for “Self-Destruction.” New music from Boogie and J.I.D. is currently on Ambrosia For Heads‘ official playlist. Eminem’s 1st Verse Of The Year Shows He’s Still At War With His Critics #BonusBeat: Boogie made a short film for Everything’s For Sale:

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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Eminem Will Show The Real 8 Mile In His Virtual Reality Documentary

Even as a musical superstar, Eminem has remained rooted in his hometown of Detroit, Michigan. His home is there, and his recording studio is there, where many of the artists on his label record. Although historically out of the traditional celebrity lifestyle, Eminem is regularly in attendance at the city’s major sporting events, and uses his city as an exteriors in videos. In the early 2000s, 8 Mile filmed on location in Greater Detroit. Meanwhile, Shady Records has been a home for many local artists’ releases, including D12, Obie Trice, and Em’s partnership with Royce 5’9, Bad Meets Evil. Fresh off of producing 2017’s Bodied satire on Battle Rap (which had a theatrical run in late 2018), Eminem is gearing up to release Marshall From Detroit. It is a 21-minute long VR 360-degree film, according to Variety. “Our idea was to extend the blanket of intimacy offered by VR beyond the once-in-a-lifetime ride with Marshall and introduce you to a more mystic version of Detroit you could never see for yourself,” director Caleb Slain told the publication. “We wanted to take the ‘reality’ out of VR and cook it down into something more unreal, but also truthful.” Eminem Names His Top 12 Rap Diss Songs Of All-Time (Audio) A 360-degree trailer has released ahead of the doc’s Sundance Festival debut this Saturday (January 26). “I don’t think we really knew who we were yet, as far as what’s gonna be our style, what’s gonna be our sound,” Em begins in a voice-over as an SUV drives through the downtown Motor City on a snowy night. “Especially back then, we used to think like, ‘Man, nobody comes from Detroit.'” Appearing on camera, the man born Marshall Mathers continues, “They look at us like a ghost town. We want to be somebody; we want to f*ckin’ stand up.” Sway Calloway’s voice can also be heard interviewing the MC/producer. Notably, Eminem was born in Saint Joseph, Missouri. After his parents separated, the artist would divide much of his youth between Michigan and Missouri. He eventually settled in the D, where he remained for most of his adulthood. Before signing with Dr. Dre, Eminem also lived in New Jersey with The Outsidaz for a period. He later made California his home while recording his early major label material. Eminem Returns To His Battle Rap Roots With 2018’s Best Freestyle (Video) On Friday (January 25), Shady Records is releasing Boogie’s Everything’s For Sale album. Eminem is a guest, as are Interscope label-mates J.I.D. and 6lack. Last year, Eminem released Kamikaze.

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Trae Compares Bars By Scarface & Bun B. His Ratings May Mess With 2 Texas Legends

Trae Tha Truth rates the bars of Scarface and Bun B in a specially-themed episode of Rate The Bars. The H-Town veteran compares excerpts from two O.G.’s widely considered to be ambassadors of Texas Rap to the rest of the world. In the ’80s and ’90s, Face and Bun Beata were trailblazers that created lanes for Trae to rise in the 2000s. Nonetheless, Trae is unafraid to be a bit critical of his past collaborators and symbolic big brothers.

Screwed Up Click alum and ABN member, emphasizes that beats as much as the hard grit of the bars are integral to his reasoning behind point choices. He feels at a disadvantage to be judging the bars off the page versus from an audio clip with the beat. He hands Brad Jordan a 3 for a guest verse on Rick Ross“Blessing In Disguise,” claiming that he relates to what is said, but suggesting that it takes a bit more to impress him.

Joe Budden Rips Future’s Mask Off For Lying About Lean

Parsing out the lyrical intricacies between rappers, Trae admits reading the lyrics does not give them the same weight as if he heard them out loud. To that end, he doles out a 2 for Bun’s “Carter Outro IV” verse. Trae then goes on to award 2’s for both Bun B’s verse on Childish Gambino’s “RIP,” as well as Scarface’s lyrics on Beyoncé’s “I Been On (Remix).” Trae admits that the latter 2 comes from “giving people the benefit of the doubt.” The MC’s rating scale may be harsh in the eyes of some, who hold ‘Face and Bun sacred.

However, Trae does get a bit more generous. He gives his former Rap-A-Lot Records label-mate a 4 for “Guess Who’s Back,” a 3 for “Mac & Brad,” and a 3.5 for“Hand Of The Dead Body.” Trae tells the show’s producers that next time he wants to select the lyrics, claiming that the excerpts he was given do not sound good when read aloud. However, he gives Scarface’s iconic “Mind Playin’ Tricks On Me” bars a perfect 5. He recognizes the verse instantly.

Scarface Explains Why He Is Done With The Geto Boys & Swears It’s For Good

He then hands Bun B a 4 for UGK’s “Diamonds And Wood,” as well as for “Murder.” Trae awards a 3 for “Money, H*es, And Power” and a 3.5 for the BDP homage “They Down With Us,” which appeared on Scarface’s The Last Of A Dying Breed LP. Trae says of some of the UGK selections that he would grade differently if he knew whether they were from before or after 1995. The Grand Hustle Records Vice President feels that the word choices should be considered.

In the total tally, Scarface edges out Bun B with a score of 20.5 to 18.5.

Bun B & Gary Clark Jr. Perform A Heartfelt Tribute To Pimp C

Last week, Trae Tha Truth released his “I’m On 3.0” music video. It features Royce 5’9, Snoop Dogg, T.I., Chamillionaire, E-40, Rick Ross, Curren$y, G-Eazy, Dave East, Mark Morrison, DRAM, and others.

Trae Tha Truth rates the bars of Scarface and Bun B in a specially-themed episode of Rate The Bars. The H-Town veteran compares excerpts from two O.G.’s widely considered to be ambassadors of Texas Rap to the rest of the world. In the ’80s and ’90s, Face and Bun Beata were trailblazers that created lanes for Trae to rise in the 2000s. Nonetheless, Trae is unafraid to be a bit critical of his past collaborators and symbolic big brothers.

Screwed Up Click alum and ABN member, emphasizes that beats as much as the hard grit of the bars are integral to his reasoning behind point choices. He feels at a disadvantage to be judging the bars off the page versus from an audio clip with the beat. He hands Brad Jordan a 3 for a guest verse on Rick Ross“Blessing In Disguise,” claiming that he relates to what is said, but suggesting that it takes a bit more to impress him.

Joe Budden Rips Future’s Mask Off For Lying About Lean

Parsing out the lyrical intricacies between rappers, Trae admits reading the lyrics does not give them the same weight as if he heard them out loud. To that end, he doles out a 2 for Bun’s “Carter Outro IV” verse. Trae then goes on to award 2’s for both Bun B’s verse on Childish Gambino’s “RIP,” as well as Scarface’s lyrics on Beyoncé’s “I Been On (Remix).” Trae admits that the latter 2 comes from “giving people the benefit of the doubt.” The MC’s rating scale may be harsh in the eyes of some, who hold ‘Face and Bun sacred.

However, Trae does get a bit more generous. He gives his former Rap-A-Lot Records label-mate a 4 for “Guess Who’s Back,” a 3 for “Mac & Brad,” and a 3.5 for“Hand Of The Dead Body.” Trae tells the show’s producers that next time he wants to select the lyrics, claiming that the excerpts he was given do not sound good when read aloud. However, he gives Scarface’s iconic “Mind Playin’ Tricks On Me” bars a perfect 5. He recognizes the verse instantly.

Scarface Explains Why He Is Done With The Geto Boys & Swears It’s For Good

He then hands Bun B a 4 for UGK’s “Diamonds And Wood,” as well as for “Murder.” Trae awards a 3 for “Money, H*es, And Power” and a 3.5 for the BDP homage “They Down With Us,” which appeared on Scarface’s The Last Of A Dying Breed LP. Trae says of some of the UGK selections that he would grade differently if he knew whether they were from before or after 1995. The Grand Hustle Records Vice President feels that the word choices should be considered.

In the total tally, Scarface edges out Bun B with a score of 20.5 to 18.5.

Bun B & Gary Clark Jr. Perform A Heartfelt Tribute To Pimp C

Last week, Trae Tha Truth released his “I’m On 3.0” music video. It features Royce 5’9, Snoop Dogg, T.I., Chamillionaire, E-40, Rick Ross, Curren$y, G-Eazy, Dave East, Mark Morrison, DRAM, and others.

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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Atmosphere’s Video Is A Father & Son B-Boy Team Becoming Stick-Up Kids For A Reason

Last October, Atmosphere’s Slug and Ant released their ninth studio album, Mi Vida Local. In support of the LP, the Minneapolis, Minnesota duo have released a handful of videos that play to themes of aging, death, alienation, and finding the good around despite so much bad news.

Atmosphere now drops “Stopwatch,” shot in Las Vegas, Nevada. During the video’s opening, producer Ant lays down a haunting, piano-driven introduction to the song before quickly picking up the pace in both tempo and ambiance. As the clock ticks, a man and his son are shown in a small café among a group of other customers. After a quick conversation with his son, the two quickly get up from their seats in a blaze and B-Boy dance across the room in a stick-up fashion. It’s a robbery, as the two take cash and abruptly end calls for help, ahead of escaping with the loot.

Atmosphere Makes An Album For Life’s Changing Seasons. All Can Listen Here (Audio)

The pair eventually make its way to a van to escape. They change their clothes as Slug’s “If you don’t stop then you won’t get caught,” plays in conjunction. After almost getting stopped by the police, they use their breakin’ talent to dance their way to freedom once again.

Then, the true nature of their theft is brought to light. As the video rounds, the young boy leaves a pile of money for a sick, dying woman under her arm at a hospital and a message, “help me,” written in red on her hand. Perhaps it is his mom, and the father’s partner.

Evidence Directs Atmosphere’s Latest Video. It’s A Different Kind Of House Party

As noted in a recent conversation between Slug and Ambrosia For Heads, Mi Vida Local, 2014’s Southsiders, 2016’s Fishing Blues, and videos like “Stopwatch,” are drenched thematically in ideas of life, death, and mortality. As Slug stated, “They’re all my ‘get comfy with the idea of death’ trilogy [albums]. These LPs also focus on family, loss, and challenging times.” Slug states, “Just in case anybody ever wanted to put them together, there’s a connection, a stream that runs through all three of them.” Mi Vida Local, is Atmosphere’s conclusion to that philosophical journey on wax.

Under the lens of their album trilogy, the imagery of the man and his son breakin’ for money to pay for the health and well-being of another is powerful and poignant. Some dancers leave a hat for donations to support themselves and those around them. These two in the video are not in a position where waiting for generosity will cut.

Atmosphere’s Graffiti Video Provides Poetic Closure To The Group’s Album Trilogy (Video)

AFH TV features a 2018 interview with Slug. We are currently offering free 30-day trials.

Last October, Atmosphere’s Slug and Ant released their ninth studio album, Mi Vida Local. In support of the LP, the Minneapolis, Minnesota duo have released a handful of videos that play to themes of aging, death, alienation, and finding the good around despite so much bad news.

Atmosphere now drops “Stopwatch,” shot in Las Vegas, Nevada. During the video’s opening, producer Ant lays down a haunting, piano-driven introduction to the song before quickly picking up the pace in both tempo and ambiance. As the clock ticks, a man and his son are shown in a small café among a group of other customers. After a quick conversation with his son, the two quickly get up from their seats in a blaze and B-Boy dance across the room in a stick-up fashion. It’s a robbery, as the two take cash and abruptly end calls for help, ahead of escaping with the loot.

Atmosphere Makes An Album For Life’s Changing Seasons. All Can Listen Here (Audio)

The pair eventually make its way to a van to escape. They change their clothes as Slug’s “If you don’t stop then you won’t get caught,” plays in conjunction. After almost getting stopped by the police, they use their breakin’ talent to dance their way to freedom once again.

Then, the true nature of their theft is brought to light. As the video rounds, the young boy leaves a pile of money for a sick, dying woman under her arm at a hospital and a message, “help me,” written in red on her hand. Perhaps it is his mom, and the father’s partner.

Evidence Directs Atmosphere’s Latest Video. It’s A Different Kind Of House Party

As noted in a recent conversation between Slug and Ambrosia For Heads, Mi Vida Local, 2014’s Southsiders, 2016’s Fishing Blues, and videos like “Stopwatch,” are drenched thematically in ideas of life, death, and mortality. As Slug stated, “They’re all my ‘get comfy with the idea of death’ trilogy [albums]. These LPs also focus on family, loss, and challenging times.” Slug states, “Just in case anybody ever wanted to put them together, there’s a connection, a stream that runs through all three of them.” Mi Vida Local, is Atmosphere’s conclusion to that philosophical journey on wax.

Under the lens of their album trilogy, the imagery of the man and his son breakin’ for money to pay for the health and well-being of another is powerful and poignant. Some dancers leave a hat for donations to support themselves and those around them. These two in the video are not in a position where waiting for generosity will cut.

Atmosphere’s Graffiti Video Provides Poetic Closure To The Group’s Album Trilogy (Video)

AFH TV features a 2018 interview with Slug. We are currently offering free 30-day trials.

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

Click Here to Discuss in the Forums

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