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Up In The Source: Looking Back at The Notorious B.I.G.’s Covers of ‘The Source Magazine’

Happy would-be 47th birthday, Biggie!

On May 21, 1972, Voletta Wallace gave birth to Christopher George Latore Wallace, the future Hip-Hop icon that we’d all go on to know and love by many aka’s — The Notorious B.I.G., Biggie Smalls, Biggie or the undisputed King of New York are usually thrown around most frequently.

On what would’ve been his 47th birthday today, it’s not hard to imagine all the things the Brooklyn-born MC would’ve achieved had his life not been ended just two-and-a-half months short of his 25th birthday. However, what he was able to accomplish in just 24 years will always be considered astounding to say the least. Two multiplatinum albums — the latter, Life After Death, even went on to achieve Diamond certification — managing a successful crew of MCs with Junior M.A.F.I.A., jumpstarting the career of a pioneering female rap solo star with Lil’ Kim, making Bad Boy the Hip-Hop record label of the ’90s alongside Puff Daddy and ultimately putting on Brooklyn in a way that still resonates from Canarsie to his beginnings in Bed-Stuy.

Biggie had an amazing relationship with The Source during his lifetime, from that notorious shoutout on “Juicy” to appearing on our cover twice before he died and multiple times in the years that followed. Today we look back on our old pal B.I.G., who by now would’ve for sure been sitting comfortably on the throne as a Hip-Hop king alongside guys like Jay-Z, Nas and Dr. Dre to name a few.

Take a look at all the times The Notorious B.I.G. was “up in” The Source. We’re sure Ms. Wallace is still smiling:


Original “The Last Word” artwork by Andre LeRoy Davis for Biggie’s first cover of The Source (Issue #70; July ’95).


JULY 1995 – The Notorious B.I.G. lands his first cover of The Source and is officially deemed “The King of New York”

Looking larger than life and standing in-between the Twin Towers, making for a photo that has now become an eerie coincidence, Biggie was at the top of his game when this cover dropped in summer 1995. The “Young, Rich & Deadly” story was helmed by OG Source writer Bönz Malone with imagery spearheaded by equally legendary photographer Chi Modu, and it’s still an extremely proud moment for us as a brand and Hip-Hop culture in general.


The Source Issue #70 (July 1995)


APRIL 1997 – The Notorious B.I.G. lands his last cover of The Source while alive

Jeff “Chairman” Mao got one of the last interviews with Biggie before he was killed on March 9, 1997, making this cover story both a profound piece of rap history and a somber memory as well. The story focused on his place at the top of the rap world after helping to bring Hip-Hop mainstream, which at the time was both a gift and curse. Many felt that although he was giving the genre some well-deserved attention on a mass level, it still was at the expense of abandoning that core street element. Life After Death was going to be his answer to the haters by proving he could do it all, commercial and hood hits alike, and we just wish he’d lived to see it all come to fruition.


The Source Issue #91 (April 1997)


MAY 1997 – The Notorious B.I.G. covers The Source again, this time way more bittersweet.

Tribute covers will never truly be something to celebrate. Sure, paying homage and giving a recently-deceased person the attention they deserve is beautiful in its intentions, but it honestly just shouldn’t have gone down this way. From a well-deserved Five Mics review for Life After Death to an unforgettable Hip-Hop Quotable from “Kick In The Door,” the whole issue was in honor of a guy who was supposed to be our future. This one will forever be a sore spot for our staff and the Hip-Hop community overall.


The Source Issue #92 (May 1997)


JANUARY 2006 – The Notorious B.I.G. continues to lives on.

Anytime you start a new year, reflections of the past will always come rushing back. To jumpstart that year, we gave the cover to Biggie and three other rap icons we’d lost at that point, including 2Pac, Eazy-E and Big Pun. Stylized in the form of stained glass figures, each man paved a way for rap to become the juggernaut that it grew into by 2006. A fitting tribute, for sure.


The Source Issue #195 (January 2006)


FEBRUARY 2007 – Biggie’s presence is still felt 10 years after his passing for a special Collectors Edition Issue.

After losing this icon a full decade prior, The Source felt necessary to give him the ultimate honor with a full tribute issue dedicated to his memory and contributions to rap. Even though it’s been an additional 10 years or so since this issue dropped, the feeling remains the same: we’ll always love Big Poppa.


The Source Issue #207 (February 2007)


DECEMBER 2008 – Biggie’s life story hits the B.I.G. screen in our special Notorious biopic issue.

Biggie had become such an icon to the world by this point, even surpassing the realms of rap, that his life story was long overdue for a biographical film. Notorious was released by Fox Searchlight Pictures in January 2009, and this special Collectors Issue was there to editorialize the story with background info to the stories told throughout the film. Give this movie a watch today to see why his memory, just like he raps on “Nasty Boy,” goes on and on and on and…


The Source Issue #228 (December 2008)


Happy would-be birthday B.I.G.! Let us know what track you guys are spinning by hitting us on Facebook and Twitter!

The post Up In The Source: Looking Back at The Notorious B.I.G.’s Covers of ‘The Source Magazine’ appeared first on The Source.

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Rapper T.I. Makes Visit to Brooklyn All Boys School Remixes One Of The Oldest Bible Scriptures In His Message

Believe or not… the rapper T.I. is not only walking the walk, but has a prophetic word bubbling in his belly.

During a recent trip to St. Paul Community Baptist Church, where he spoke to several students at the Imagine Me Leadership Charter School, he remixed one of the oldest scriptures in the bible. He said to the young men in a fashion dripped with as much swag as this the Grand Hustle mogul could possibly muster:

“I want you all to understand is unique. Every day is a new opportunity to get out there, and make the day better than you were the day before. That is gonna depend largely upon what you chose to put into the day. There are a lot of times you hear people say, ‘Oh I am having such a bad day. It is such an ugly day outside.’ I want you all to understand that you are in control of how your day goes. We are very, very rarely in control of things that happen to us, but what we control is how we respond to the things that happen to us.”

Without knowing it, he “made live” for this future generation of brothers of faith Job 38: 12-13 that says, “Have you commanded the morning since your days began,
And caused the dawn to know its place, That it might take hold of the ends of the earth, And the wicked be shaken out of it?” By sharing with the young men that they can control their days by setting the tone from the beginning of it, he paraphrases a message The Lord gives to Job while he is discouraged after God allowed him to be stricken by The Satan, losing all his wealth, family and good health. While many lay people believe that the Pentateuch is the oldest books of the bible, stating that they are actually the first five book (see the name), those books are carbon dated to have been written between 1446 and 1406 B.C. Scholars like Dr. Jin Han from the New York Theological Seminary contends, that The Book of Job was written by unknown Israelite around 1500 B.C. 

Either way, the age old wisdom remains and Tip in his own way, made it plain. Good job, T.I.

Imagine Me Leadership Charter School (IMLCS) that not only provides a positive, nurturing environment along with an exciting, rigorous, academic and cultural program where boys learn to become responsible citizens, life-long learners, and community leaders. This East New York school boasts that its 4th graders have passed several New York High School Regents exams and has been identified by The New York State Education Department as a Reward School for the THIRD consecutive school year.

 

The post Rapper T.I. Makes Visit to Brooklyn All Boys School Remixes One Of The Oldest Bible Scriptures In His Message appeared first on The Source.

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Exclusive: The Cast of Netflix’s ‘See You Yesterday’ Break Down How They Intertwined Black Culture Into a Sci-Fi Flick

Spike Lee has another joint for us, and this one takes us into the world of sci-fi with a cast of strong Black leads and a setting that takes place in the heart of Brooklyn. Starting today, we urge you all to expand your minds, explore the impossible and get into Netflix’s newest time traveling epic that is See You Yesterday.



Directed by rising filmmaker Stefon Bristol and starring Eden Duncan-Smith, Danté Crichlow and rapper Stro — all four of them young and ready to take Hollywood by storm — See You Yesterday centers around a plot that’ll make you laugh, cry and probably want to go study quantum physics. The film takes us into the lives of two Black teens from Brooklyn that discover time travel and use it to reverse the outcome of police brutality stemming from the death of a family member. However, they soon find out that going back in time to change the past can cause some serious problems in present time, which creates an even bigger dilemma overall. The entire story arc is told with great detail that proves this film wasn’t pulled off overnight; actually, it originally started as a short film released in 2017 before Spike linked with Stefon to give it a big-budget makeover under his legendary production company 40 Acres & A Mule Filmworks. Outside of a charming cast, great storytelling and even a meta cameo by Back To The Future star Michael J. Fox, the film tackles many issues that affect the Black community on all levels.

We wanted to dig deeper to get a breakdown of how it all comes together straight from the stars themselves, and thankfully The Source got to see an early screening of See You Yesterday during Tribeca Film Festival in New York City earlier this month. We spoke with Stefon, Eden, Danté and Stro to see how each of them viewed the topics and themes depicted in the film.

Keep scrolling to see what the stars of See You Yesterday had to say about making a sci-fi film that puts Black culture at the forefront of the future on multiple levels:


“I love Black people — that’s all I can say honestly [Laughs]. When I was working on making the film, I’d never seen young Black kids do STEM [Education] before onscreen. It’s funny, because I was trying to figure out how to do the time travel — should they go through a portal? Should someone else build the machine for them? — and it happened to where it just made sense for them to be the ones who invented it; you’ve never seen brilliant kids like this before. Often in movies Black children are always [depicted as] in a gang, selling drugs, being rappers or being ball players, and I felt there was more to us than that. I needed to see that onscreen, but I didn’t know there was such a need when writing [See You Yesterday]. I was seeing comments like, “This is a need!” and “I’m so glad this came out!” [The absence] was very bothersome, so I was happy to make it.

[Making See You Yesterday] required a lot of tone balance plus trial and error. I really needed to create a story about a family, and people love this family so much that you hope to see them win. When the inevitable happens, you just want to feel sorry for them and love them. Often when we see Black people being killed by police, the media will try to find blemishes in the wrongful killing with stuff like, “He was smoking weed in his apartment” or “He robbed a store before” to warrant his or her death. I made sure there weren’t any blemishes on these kids besides their own flaws in personality. That’s a very strong component in screenwriting — Make sure your characters have flaws, please! [Laughs] I wanted to make sure that when the inevitable happens, you ultimately love them for them.”

— Stefon Bristol, director



“When we started the short in 2015, I think the most important thing was to show police brutality in a very upfront way. I think the film does a really great job at showing the spectrum of police brutality, from harassing kids on the street who are just talking to their little sisters to literally killing them in cold blood. I think that’s a very important aspect of the movie that people should take from it. Other than that, there’s the aspect of Black teenage scientists. It’s something you don’t see often. The teenagers in this film go to The Bronx High School of Science, which is a crazy hard school to get into [Laughs]! People like Neil deGrasse Tyson went there, and it’s just a really great school. It’s so important to show Black teens doing really great things like inventing time travel. I think it’s definitely time to show these two aspects in the same light so we can see the fullness of Black life. We see a lot of movies of Black life at home or just socially, but we’re showing how we have to handle ourselves around the police and also us doing more than music, sports or any of the occupations apposed on us daily. We strip away at those stereotypes and it’s just important to be showing that, especially now at this time in life.

I think Stefon’s goal with [my character] CJ was that not all female Black nerds are quiet; they can be outspoken and bold. From the colors she was wearing down to the braids, it was very important to show Black culture in that way. It’s not just curly hair or a weave, because we have so many different hairstyles that we go in and out of on a daily basis. Even the variations of the way I wore my braids in the film was conscious as well. With how loud she might be or even “rough” as Eduardo’s grandmother puts it [Laughs], CJ is still very smart. It’s never a question of whether or not she is, and I hope I brought that to the character of CJ. I hope people take away that you can be big and bold yet very focused on the things you want to do in life.”

— Eden Duncan-Smith, Claudette ‘CJ’ Walker



“For this movie in general, we were trying to tackle stereotypes of African Americans in our society and the way they’re perceived due to the lifestyles they live. Having [the lead characters] be teenagers at a predominately scientific institution, being STEM students, and being sophomores in high school wasn’t a mistake; that was intentional. It was so important to have representation for younger kids to look at this movie and feel like they could aspire to be that. For adults who have been living this life already, they now have something to relate to. For me, what I wanted to bring to [my character] Sebastian was this sense of being three-dimensional in a human sense. He’s not just a Black scientist; he’s a human being trying to get into college, he’s someone who gets frustrated with his best friend and he’s just someone trying to stop bad things from happening. I wanted all those different dynamics to be there so that when you look at Sebastian Thomas, you don’t just look at him as a Black face or a number on a screen. You ultimately see him as a human being.

[Working on set] honestly felt like I was working from home [Laughs]! The first scene that has the police encounter with Calvin, his friend, CJ and Sebastian, and the guy walks by and he’s like, “Bun a fyah! BUN A FYAH!” is so accurate! I feel like I see that everyday [Laughs]. I thought those little instances and moments that aren’t necessarily dialogue are what make Stefon a genius as a director. For me, one aspect was loving feeling at home on set and the other was being part of a great piece of art. While this has aspects of police brutality, keeping the childlike relationship between CJ and Sebastian was so important. We really wanted to show that these are children and teenagers going through something they shouldn’t have to. They’re just trying to live their lives and get into college, yet there’s something in society that isn’t allowing that. Regardless of if it’s sci-fi, fantasy or fan fiction, keeping that element of reality in there shows their drive to keep pushing back. That undertone message of keep pushing back, no matter how hard the fight gets, is integral to this movie.”

— Danté Crichlow, Sebastian J. Thomas



“Making this film was surreal for me because I’m from East Flatbush. Just watching it from an outside perspective was dope because it felt like I was home onscreen. We don’t see a lot of films being shot in those parts of Brooklyn either, especially right now. They’d prefer to go to the parts everybody frequents, or just go for the brownstone aesthetic. For Stefon to take East Flatbush and show the humanity and the everyday vibe was amazing to me. As far as what we’re trying to achieve with [See You Yesterday], we wanted to spark the conversation around police brutality and the idea of a Black sci-fi film. Someone said they hadn’t seen something like this in their generation, and to be part of this is a blessing and very special to me.

My family is West Indian, so growing up in East Flatbush you see a lot of the stuff depicted in this film. It has a very homely vibe too, because even the guy with the cart in the alley gives off a vibe like that’s his spot. There’s a lot of that in Flatbush — those characters really exist there and will not be moved. Seeing it onscreen was dope, but I witnessed that regularly in real-life growing up. That’s what you get when you go over there; that whole area is just Jamaicans [Laughs].”

When I first tried acting, the role I read for I got on my first shot. That was a blessing because I never took acting classes. I’ve sat down with an acting coach maybe once or twice, but other than that it’s been me going over roles with my management, building in the living room for the most part and sending in my audition tape. People would say things like, “You have a natural, real vibe onscreen,” and I just continued to tap into that. It was never my goal to be an actor, but after seeing this film I will say that it makes me feel like I want to pursue it further. After everyone telling me they liked what I did in this film and me watching it myself, I can see why they would say the positive things. It’s making me appreciate the art of acting way more. The difference between the film world and the music industry is a matter of weird versus fake. In Hollywood, you hear stories and it’s just like, “That’s what they do; they weird!” The music industry has a lot of people smiling but it’s hard to know who’s genuine. I’m not a big actor, but I believe that whoever sees this film will open doors up for not just me, but also for Eden and Dante. The talent always comes first.”

— Stro, Calvin Walker


You can watch See You Yesterday right now by streaming it on Netflix.

Images: Netflix

The post Exclusive: The Cast of Netflix’s ‘See You Yesterday’ Break Down How They Intertwined Black Culture Into a Sci-Fi Flick appeared first on The Source.

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Vets Return To QOTR & Shows Fans What A Panic Room Looks Like

Queen of The Ring is making up for lost time with cramming in this first half of the year, a few fire cards.

With the return of Ms. Hustle against Nu Jerzey Twork still fresh in female battle rap fans mind, QOTR cooked up a card that would live up to the last one. Panic Room 4, with its star studded roster, was dope.

First up was Jade (from We Go Hard) vs. Panic (from Chicago).

Jade was cooking both in her first and second rounds. Panic came to play, but had some stumble problems throughout the majority of the bout. Her name flips (that whole “green” thing) probably secured her an invitation back to the big stage. She was not wack, but just not better than Jade. The battle was entertaining as both ladies seem to vibe off each other. As the battle progressed you could tell that both of the ladies were friends. What most demonstrated their bond was when during the bottom on the third, the two of them tagged team Debo about a prior discrepancy pertaining the two emcees.  This was probably the best move in Panic’s performance in the battle. It put battle in context, reminding the fans that this is a business and not a hobby for these ladies.

Next battle was a co-ed battle between Shotgun Suge and Shooney Da Rapper.  The prayer going into the battle was that nothing happens during this battle that might jeopardize a potential classic. And sure enough… something “technical difficulties” almost stopped the momentum of the battle very early on. Suge started his round and the lights for the camera went out (a cord was tripped over).  That’s ok. The battle rap angels were on deck, and everything got back on track when the Jersey spit-kicker jumped in his bag. He was wigging on Shooney, manhandling her both lyrically and physically during this one rounder. This URL vet did not take it easy. And truth be told, he could not. Shooney had bars, humor, presence and an entire cheering squad in her arsenal against the Crip. Shooney stumbled. We can’t ignore that. However, when she got it back her fans were pleased. She stood before the battle giant in a way that no other woman has dared. Giving him a double portion of his own “What’s You Life Likes” and “Let’s Get One Thing Straight.” Good one round battle. Got to give it to Suge.

The next battle was the top billed battle: Ms. Fit vs. Phara Funeral. Ms. Fit for her return was not taking any prisoners. It has been a while since the Murda Ave. Qing hit the ring, and many wondered if she would have some ring rust. With only eight battles on cam and over five years out of the field, many suspected that she could not keep up with a Phara who has been relatively active over the last few seasons. All of those doubts immediately were wiped away once she took her position in the ring. If the ring is the jungle, Fit approached the battle like a black panther (not the movie, the civil rights leaders but the wild feline). A black panther is an ambush predator and she relies on being stealth and the element of surprise to sneak up on its unsuspecting prey. As a lyrical technician, she locked in on Phara with a ninja like surprise that was more dynamic than you would expect from her little frame. Yes, shorter and smaller than Phara, but she towered over her with a confidence that was (what’s the word) masculine. Her big cat-ism made her look like a dude picking on the fly girl in the club. But instead of using lines to ingratiate herself with her opponent, she seemed to make her angry. Making Phara angry is never a good thing.  If Fit was a panther, Phara was like a lionness, clearly circling her prey. Like lionesses in the jungle, one half of Shuneral had a pride with her. In her corner, there was the “who’s who” in female battle rap.

Tia S and Lexx Banko were the surprised battle of the night. It was good to see the veteran Banko back in the ring. Tia S is making a name for herself with the ways he reps for the new class and how she handles bars. This battle was a debatable. Both ladies came to play. I liked Banko’s wordplay a little more, but I loved how Tia S had presence that is not easily denied. It could go either way.

Phara is not a crowd favorite just because of her looks, despite what people have been saying. Phara is a fan favorite because we care about what she says. We also care how she says it. Like her best friend Shooney, she stumbled too throughout the battle. Didn’t matter… She with entertaining self said some “sh*t” and acted out for the fans. There was a lot of talk about the old Phara. Ms. Fit talked about the old waves, even Phara went there for a second but decided to go a different route. She brought back her jean jacket from the Chayna Ashley battle out and that got a cool reaction. The biggest reactions were from Ms. Fit tossing dollars at Phara while she was rapping.  But was funnier was the rebuttal, where Phara came out with a fake twerk and picked up a few. Great showmanship from both ladies in the first two rounds. In the third round, Ms. Fit was cooking but broke her agreement to not mention Phara’s mother, thus causing Phara to forfeit the last round. This made what could have been a debatable battle, a clear win for Fit.

The last battle was between Chayna Ashley and C3.

Like Ms. Fit, Chayna has not been in the ring in some time.  Also like Fit, this Dot Mob member has only done eight battles. Like Fit, she stepped away to make money with commercial music… music that is fire so if you can go cop it do so… Chayna was up first and she was in her bag. With her Dot brother T-Rex in her corner, she angle her round like a season vet reminding each and every new girl that she was a) first generation, b) the reason they are getting checks now and c) that she is back. It was interesting to hear the narrative threaded throughout her round. It seamlessly stitched up how the vet girls feel about the new girls. She drew attention to how at one point about five years ago, they were neck-and-neck with the master of all battle rap leagues, URL. This was a great accomplishment, but the with those girls not on the scene the newer girls let the league drop and crumble in popularity. Bold statement. Should she have been check? Maybe… if it did not appear to be true. Over the years, without the star studded roster that it had a few years ago, the newer girls have struggled to maintain the same star power- thus the same popularity for the brand. There is plenty blame to go around, and C3 upon her turn was there to address some of it.

C3 is deadly. She is such a swift wit with her rebuttals that many fear her. And to start her round (leading almost until the middle), she started freestyling. However a skill that this gifted emcee needs to learn is how to not let her emotions pour over into the round. So passionate about what Chayna said (she retorted that she put herself on) and that this battle originally was scheduled as a three rounder and CA at the last minute (apparently due to a death in her circle), could only do a one rounder, C3 could not get it together to strike like she normally does. This was not the C3 against Tay Roc. She even let Rex egging CA on frazzle her, demanding that she would not finish if he was still on the ring.  It would not be fair no matter how dope Chayna was to simply say she beat C3… the real review from my perspective is that this (again) gifted emcee defeated herself.

Congrats to Debo, Babs and Vague for another great event. In the audience was several influencers and battlers; Tori Doe, Torture, T-Top, K-Shine, O-Red, Fettuccine20 and more.

 

 

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The Source Supports and Sponsors Harvard’s Diverse Up Before Sunrise Group’s Launch Party and Initiative

When you hear “Harvard” you know a few things…

Harvard is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States,  you have to be pretty smart to be invited into its prestigious ranks or come from what some people call “old money.” Old money could be translated as “white money.” But students of color on the campus have taken leaps to diversify the playing field and create spaces for multi-culturalism, Black and brown ethnic identity and the spirit of Hip-Hop to flourish. Enter the Diverse UBSG (Up Before Sunrise Group). This group provides fellowship, support and resources to other students that are up before the sun and ready to grind. These talented students create a network with working professionals that further provides a bridge from the academy to the real work place.

They also know how to get lit.

This weekend Harvard’s Diverse UBSG is hosting what has been pegged as the “biggest party you’ve ever been to” on Sunday, May 5th from noon to 5pm. It is an all black party, so get dipped. This ticketed and tented event will be held at the Gore Estate. Their special guest performances will be by the legendary Doug E. Fresh and BIA.

While what Diverse UBSG is doing positive work, they build on the foundation uniquely tied to The Source over 30 years ago.

30 Years ago on Harvard’s campus, The Source was founded by students on the yard that loved the music of the culture. These four gentlemen combined their personal musical taste & politics, understanding of the rhymes and rhythm, with a strong since entrepreneurship to build the most powerful brand in the history of Hip-Hop media.

Join us as we celebrate the next phase of UBSG’s movement. Tickets available here.

Stay tune… you will see The Source return to Harvard later this year, for a big 30 year celebration.

 

 

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Celebs Kick Off National Mental Health Awareness Month With Silence the Shame Panel

Hip-Hop is truly growing up.
Back in the day, rappers held close to their heart the idea of “Keeping it Real.” This emotional disguise has led many to an early grave via drugs, violence or suicide.  Nowadays, many in the culture have found alternative ways to deal with trauma and depression and the leaders in the industry has added their voices to the growing choir. Organizations like Silence the Shame are making the difference.

Recently, Silence the Shame partnered with MusiCares in New York City to present The Soundtrack Of Mental Health Vol.2. The Soundtrack of Mental Health Vol. 2 was a community conversation and panel discussion that addressed the stigma associated with mental illness. The event was held in the atrium of Island Records and featured a powerful group of panelists, that included Founder of Silence the Shame Shanti Das, New York Times best-selling author and radio host Charlamagne Tha God, Founder/CEO of Family Tree Entertainment Michael “Blue” Williams, Board Certified Psychiatrist Cynthia Lewis, SVP of Marketing and Brand Partnerships at Atlantic Records Joi Brown, Music Executive David Lighty, and Licensed Clinical Social Worker, Dr. Randolph Sconiers.



The event was held to kick off May which is National Mental Health Awareness Month and May 5th is National Silence the Shame Day.  The foundation is kicking off their fundraiser to increase funds for programs and scholarships with a national text-a-thon.

To donate text the word SILENCE to 707070 or visit their website www.silencetheshame.com and click to donate.

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Today in Hip-Hop History: Bone Crusher Debuted 16 Years Ago With ‘AttenCHUN!’

“I ain’t never scared!”

Say that phrase to any longtime rap fan, and the response will either be “East Side!” if you’re anywhere near New York, “West Side!” if Cali vibes are your wave, “South Side!” for the ATLiens out there or “North Side!” if you’re, well, Drake. All jokes aside though, the term will forever be burned in our collective Hip-Hop conscience thanks to Wayne Hardnett Jr., better known to the world as Atlanta-bred rapper Bone Crusher.

Today we decided to take it back to 2003, as the early ’00s Hip-Hop star released his debut album AttenCHUN! 16 years ago today.


So So Def/Arista


The aforementioned Avery Johnson-produced lead single “Never Scared” is still a staple in locker rooms across the nation as a classic get-hype pregame song — the “Football Remix” was even featured in Madden 2004. It eventually would become a Top 4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 (#26), as well as a top 10 hit on the Rap chart at #6. The album has other gems featured on it as well though, including the equally hyphy “Lock & Load” intro, head-thumping “Sound The Horn” and the smooth deep cut “Peaches & Cream” among other tracks. The album, released under So So Def/Arista and produced entirely by Jermaine Dupri, also has a heavy list of heavy hitters featured throughout, including T.I., Killer Mike, David Banner, Goodie Mob and JD on an intro for the obvious standout song. Speaking of “Never Scared” (again), there’s also the fire “Takeover Remix” featuring an all-star roundup that includes Cam’ron, Jadakiss and Busta Rhymes — in that order — representing for the “EAST SIDE!!!”

The album proved to be a major success in 2003, peaking in the top 20 on the Billboard 200 charts at #11 and topping the R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart as well. Although many felt that the album was weighed down with too many interludes or that the production started to get repetitive — i.e. an album full of “Never Scared”-sounding b-sides — the album as a whole seamed together perfectly to make for one truly energy-inducing LP.

While AttenCHUN! proved to be Bone Crusher’s only hit album, releasing just two more albums before going silent in 2007, The Source along with everyone who’s ever played Def Jam: Fight for NY will always remember the guy who helped define crunk rap. Salute to the king!

Happy 16th anniversary to AttenCHUN! by Bone Crusher! Stream it today for a good ’03 throwback, and watch the classic music video for “Never scared” below:

The post Today in Hip-Hop History: Bone Crusher Debuted 16 Years Ago With ‘AttenCHUN!’ appeared first on The Source.

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5001 and 1: Cassidy Returns to Battle Rap and Loses To Goodz

It was the power card of the era.

Resolution lived up to its name by resolving the ever burning questions that Hip-Hop fans in general and Battle Rap enthusiasts specifically have been asking for years:

Battle Rap’s elite gathered to see if Cassidy, probably their childhood favorite, could beat their colleague, Goodz.

Is Cassidy really the best battler ever and is his record really with an undefeated record?

Could Cassidy keep his spotless record if he were ever to step on a stage with killers known to eat industry rappers for dinner?

Did Half-A-Gallon Goodz, the Henny-drinking-style-on-them-hustler beat Cassidy in a battle back in the day at a Ruff Ryders’ video shoot?

Well, the answers flooded the gates after the last bout on URL’s last card unfolded before out eyes on Saturday, April 27th. No. Not now. We thought so, but nah. Probably.

READ MORE: Cassidy Returns To Battle Rap Vs. Goodz on SMACK/URLTV

Cassidy vs. Goodz on SMACK/URL’s Resolution Card on April 27th.

Cassidy who boasted a astounding 5001 and o record in battling all during promo for the epic contest, took his first “L” to a rapper that he repeated tried to son in interview after interview. And while it was Goodz’ shinning redemptive moment, it really was a victory for the culture- Emcees that desperately are on guard watching for imitators that slip in off the clout of gold records, major label marketing budgets and the buzz of yesteryear glory. The Bronx swag-animal stunted on the Philly lyrical miracle with a 3-0 (maybe 2-1 if you give The Hustler the first round).

Cassidy came off strong.

“Ok, I punch a lot. I’m telling u now, and that fake ass ice u got will not make the swelling go down!”

The crowd went bonkers. For many their king had returned (or finally came).

He hit them with the lines “before GPS, I was stuck in my waze,” and “Shots I’ll clap on 5th, like I shop at Saks.” But the bar that left everyone stuck and that clapped louder than any machete D.N.A. could have shoot was “I never lost a battle SMACK. I made battle rap popular, you got popular off battle rap”

READ MORE: Cassidy Returns to the Stage, But Remember When He Battled Freeway?

His first round proved that he was still a beast with those words. Punch after punch, he clearly prepared for the battle and knew the Battle Rap industry like a true ethnomusicologist might. [Ed. Note] And that should not be the question. Unlike many other rappers who decide to hop on this stage, it is clear that Cassidy (and Joe Budden despite both of their loses) love and are a part of the culture in an experiential way. Punch after punch, Cassidy exploded. Ironically, Cassidy did not craft rounds in a way that broke down Goodz. The braggadocious style that is probably in Cass’ dna did not have room for Goodz to really be the subject of his round. It was all about Cass.

Still, that was not enough. Henny-less cup-holding Goodz was calm, collected and eyes zoned in on his opponent. One angle that Goodz took during the battle was to unpacked Cassidy’s obsession with rapping- juxtaposing his obsession with getting money trapping (BARS Y’ALL).

A nail in the coffin line Goodz spit that encapsulated this sentiment was, “You think I give a f*ck about a gold album? N*gga, I went gold in the streets!”  The crowd with their drug-dealing-talking selves went wild.

Cassidy also had a line that erupted the crowd.

He mentioned Goodz watching the infamous R. Kelly tape and then said something like the next little girl on Kelly’s tape is going to be Goodz’ daughter. Perhaps all is fair in love and war, but this may have crossed the line. Instead of people giving the Jaz face (made popular by the champion femcee when bars are just nasty), people moaned in disgust. This may have been too soon for the culture to accept, especially after the Tech 9’s death/child pornography/ sexual assault allegations hit the news. People held their breath knowing how Goodz gets about his daughter, but he did not snap and there was no repeat of what happened that other time he thought someone said something about his angel.

READ MORE: Goodz vs Jimz: Is This The Swag Battle Of The Year?

But there were some schemes that made people really take note. One in particular when he ran through all of the battle rap bloggers using “figurative language,” culminating with “I drop knowledge, he couldn’t drop gems.”  Cass’ word-play is undeniable. Knowledge is the popular blogger from the hit Battle Rap media platform, HipHopIsReal.com and gems was in reference to the popular battler and blogger, Jimz.

Well, then why are you saying Cass lost? Funny you should ask rap-grasshopper.

Picture this… and this is probably for the entire battle… Cassidy is a champion fighter that no one can deny… has great form… technique is exquisite… but he is in the mirror battling. He is boxing himself, shadow-boxing maybe. Cassidy did not leave room in his “lyrical masterpiece” to include Goodz in his part of the battle. His focus was on being the best rappity rap rapper alive… and not the best battler of the night.

Another way to look at it is that he was intellectually masturbating with each round saying to himself that “Whose battle is this?” “What’s my name!” And not pleasing the folk who came to enjoy the show. He had no care whether or not he gave a good show, but rather was more concerned with defending a legacy that no one really wanted to take from him… they just wanted some humility, reality and respect for the culture.

To the contrary, Goodz did not talk that much during the promo season nor throughout the battle… but when he did… things like this fell out:

“How you get 100k for a battle, but can’t get 100k for a show?” SMACK on the side giggling making the bar hit harder.

“Since you were good with a Freeway, they keep giving you an EZ Pass.” Of course making note of one of his 2.5 battles on cam against then Roc-A-Fella flame-spitter Freeway, and how easy people have been on him in the culture.

Apparently, the URL team arranged for this battle to go last. Makes sense, since the battle was so anticipated- and no one really knew how Cassidy was going to do.  The card was chock-full of amazing battles leading to this one.

Would we like to see Cassidy again? Absolutely. Him against Suge would be awesome to watch. Did he keep that undefeated crown? Is he the best to ever do it? Is he above any of the names that folk have been saying are their Mt. Rushmore of battle rap? -HELL NAH…

But we want to see him again.

 

The post 5001 and 1: Cassidy Returns to Battle Rap and Loses To Goodz appeared first on The Source.

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Cannabis Politics in NJ: Are You A Flintstone or Jetson?

POWERED BY SELECT CBD

WORDS BY LEO BRIDGEWATER

Most Cannabis activist will agree with the sentiment that the legalization effort has been one big real life civics lesson mixed with drama, comedy, and adventure. The frustration is real and the sacrifices made by ourselves and our families have been costly.

The decision to pull New Jersey’s Adult Use Cannabis bill S2703 from the senate floor for a vote was a smart move by NJ Senate President Steve Sweeney. The Senate didn’t have the votes needed to pass the bill and he essentially brought NJ more time to get the necessary support. The problem in NJ is we have two types of people: Flintstones and Jetsons.

READ MORE: Mike Tyson to Host New Cannabis Friendly & “The Kind Music Festival” in 2019

Our entire legislature is made up of mostly Flintstones and we’re asking them to make rules to a Jetsons game. These identifiers transcend race, age, gender, and religion. There are some really young Flintstones in NJ, and they are not all white. They are easy to identify because they tell on themselves by the words they use. If you still use the term “Gateway drug” when describing Cannabis, you’re a Flintstone. When describing Cannabis if you use the term “Dope”, you are a Flintstone. Regular Cannabis consumers haven’t used those terms in years. The gateway theory was scientifically debunked years ago. In fact, states that have comprehensive Medical Cannabis Programs are seeing an average of 25% reduction of Opioid addiction incidents and a drop in the number of prescriptions being written.

READ MORE: Senator Introduces Medical Marijuana Bill to Help Child Navigate Epilepsy

Which is bad news for three types of money in New Jersey:

Old money, the Pharmaceutical Industry has been operating in New Jersey for generations.

Long money, the alcohol industry has been operating in New Jersey for generations also.

Big money, the Prison Industrial complex has been thriving in New Jersey evidence by ACLU’s annual arrest report for 2018.

This is happening because our ability to educate the masses has been severely hampered by a bunch of Flintstones. Education is how we can bring order to chaos in an industry that’s still in its infancy. It is also through education is how we can turn Flintstones in Jetsons and welcome them into the new world.

The post Cannabis Politics in NJ: Are You A Flintstone or Jetson? appeared first on The Source.

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Exclusive: The Roots Break Down the Importance of Bringing Hip-Hop to Coachella During Their Heineken House Set

“If my memory serves correct, I think we did the first-ever Coachella, right?” – Questlove

“We did do the first Coachella — I remember I had a broken foot.”Black Thought

Sure, no one forgets that time they had to perform in front of thousands in the middle of a desert with a broken foot, but unfortunately the guys’ collective memory was off by one year — two if you consider the gap between Coachella 1999 (the actual inaugural festival) and Coachella 2001 (the year The Roots performed). Memory aside though, both Questlove and Black Thought, along with the rest of the band members of The Roots, absolutely killed it during their over two-hour set for Coachella 2019. Thankfully The Source was on the scene to not only experience the show live, but we even got to sit down with the gentlemen afterwards for hazy recollections like the one seen above in addition to a few other standout quotables.



Holding things down for Day 2 at the Heineken House stage, The Roots’ frontmen ran through a bevy of their hits to create the atmosphere of a funk/soul-themed day party that extended well into the night, assisted by jams, libations and the new Heineken 0.0 which is pretty refreshing and surprisingly alcohol-free. As a result of these two and the band as a whole, classic Hip-Hop was properly brought yet again to Coachella Valley, where rap, R&B and Black music in general is being welcomed at a rapid rate in recent years.

We got a chance to cop it up with Tariq and Ahmir about why the culture of rap is so important to big festivals like Coachella, and how bands like The Roots and even De La Soul — both bands performed back-to-back on the same stage — are doing their due diligence to keep it that way.

For those preparing to experience Coachella Weekend 2, starting today (4/19) and going until Sunday (4/21), here’s a Source Exclusive preview from the guys of The Roots themselves on why Hip-Hop is officially taking over the desert:



“I feel like Hip-Hop has involved into the pop music; Pop music is Hip-Hop. For years, it has been some variation of rock & roll, and now I feel like it’s evolved to Hip-Hop. If you’re gonna embrace the most popular music like Coachella does, you just have to embrace Hip-Hop. In regards to what we do, I think it’s important to acknowledge the foundation from which we came — that’s what The Roots represents. Back in the day you used to only see rock bands performing with live instrumentation. Now, anyone doing a festival that’s at the caliber of Coachella or wherever you’ll be performing in front of thousands of people will want some live instrumentation. I feel like we represent that foundation.”

Black Thought, The Roots



“Shoutout to the Heineken House people for having us out here.”

– Questlove



“We did the Heineken House a couple of years ago, just Quest and I on a DJ/drum set thing, and I was like, ‘Damn, this would’ve killed if we were able to play this sort of intimate performance with the whole band. It was dope to do this performance tonight with them.”

Black Thought



“I really enjoy a smaller scale situation. I like more intimate crowds — it’s like a dance party.”

— Questlove



“There are so many elements of our show that are De La Soul-inspired or that I’ve jacked from their set [Laughs]. That in itself was also an evolution; to see De La [Soul], the foundation, and coming after them was dope, too. It made for a super special experience. I was watching them in the audience as we did certain shit that came from them, and for them to see what it has become is dope. If we were on a bigger stage where [the crowd] was farther away, it would’ve been different because we wouldn’t have been able to interact and see one another. It was really nice.”

Black Thought



Still in the festival spirit? Peep our style feature on the Best Rap T-Shirts spotted at Coachella during Weekend 1, including Questlove’s hilarious “Fyre Fest” Ja Rule tee!




Images: Jesse Lirola (@jesselirola)

The post Exclusive: The Roots Break Down the Importance of Bringing Hip-Hop to Coachella During Their Heineken House Set appeared first on The Source.

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