Tag Archives: Exclusives

Happy 49th Birthday To The Late Phife Dawg! Check Out The Top 5 Phife Verses Of All Time

On this day in 1970, the second lyrical half of A Tribe Called Quest, Phife Dawg was born. Born Malik Isaac Taylor in Queens, New York, Phife was one-fourth of one of the most influential groups in Hip Hop culture; A Tribe Called Quest. It’s been almost four years since Phife lost his battle with diabetes, however, his music will live on for eternity.

On many of ATCQ’s tracks, fans have always rightfully celebrated Q-Tip’s lyricism, but rarely gave Phife Dawg his proper due. In posthumous honor of his birthday, we have put together a list of his top five hottest verses to shine light on the unsung lyrical phenom that is Phife Dawg.

5. “Electric Relaxation” On this standout track from the album Midnight Marauders, Phife and The Abstract went toe to toe, trading off verse without a hook until the song ended, with standout bars like, “Let me hit it from the back, girl I won’t catch a hernia/Bust off on your couch, now you got Seaman’s Furniture..”and let’s not forget, “I like ‘em brown, yellow, Puerto Rican or Haitian/Name is Phife Dawg from the Zulu Nation..”

4. “La Schmoove” This was a featured verse from Phife Dawg on a track by Brooklyn rap tongue twisters Fu Schnickens. On this track, Phife had the third verse, yet opened it like it was his own song saying,

Now here I go, once again with the ill flow/Other MC’s that rap, their style is so-so..”

3. “Scenario” Being one of the most popular songs on A Tribe Called Quest’s Low End Theory album, Phife Dawg’s opening verse is one that rings in the ears of many rap fans.

“Ayo, Bo knows this, and Bo knows that/ But bo don’t know jack cause Bo can’t rap//Well what do you know, the Di-Dawg, is first up to bat/No batteries included and no strings attached.”

2. “Award Tour” Another cut from Midnight Marauders, Award Tour was a huge success for A Tribe Called Quest. It also houses some of Phife Dawg’s strongest metaphors.
“I have a quest to have a mic in my hand/without that, it’s like Kryptonite and Superman/So Shaheed come in with the sugar cuts//Phife Dawg’s my name, but on stage, call me Dynomut..t”

“So, next time that you think you want something here/Make something dope or take that garbage to St.Elsewhere..”

1. “Buggin Out” Coming from their most popular album, this is regarded as Phife’s illest bars. Phife Dawg spits two of the hardest verses on the album on this one record.
“Yo microphone check one, two, what is this?/The five foot assassin with the roughneck business/I float like gravity, never had a cavity/Got more rhymes than the Winans got family..”

“You soar off to another world, deep in your mind/But people seem to take that, as being unkind/’Oh yo he’s acting stank,’ really on the regal?/a man of the fame not a man of the people/believe that if you want but I tell you this much/riding on the train with no dough, sucks..”

The post Happy 49th Birthday To The Late Phife Dawg! Check Out The Top 5 Phife Verses Of All Time appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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Today In Hip Hop History: Mobb Deep Released Their ‘Hell On Earth’ LP 23 Years Ago

The dynamic duo of Mobb Deep from QB released their third full-length studio LP 23 years ago today.

On this date in 1996, the “infamous” crew from Mobb Deep dropped album number three entitled Hell On Earth. The Mobb-produced project was released under the epic Loud/RCA imprint introduced many of the extended QB/Mobb family including raspy-voiced Twin Gambino, Big Noyd, and a few others. Hav and P enlisted some of the game’s top dogs of the time for this album including their QB brethren Nas, Wu’s Raekwon the Chef and Method Man.

This certified gold classic was unquestionably a part of the East Coast arsenal against the West Coast during the height of the rivalry, with tracks such as the title track, “Still Shinin’”, and of course, “Drop A Gem On ‘Em”, sending overt threats at Tupac Shakur and his cohorts. Other standout joints include “G.O.D. Pt.III”, where Prodigy drops some street knowledge, “Blood Sport”, and “Give It Up Fast” featuring Noyd and Nas.
This album was also the project that confirmed Havoc’s skills as a producer, which led to several other projects outside of the Mobb.

Salute to P, Hav, Noyd, Gotti, Twin, Ty Nitty, Nas, Rae, Meth, Steve Rifkind, and everyone else involved with this classic album!

The post Today In Hip Hop History: Mobb Deep Released Their ‘Hell On Earth’ LP 23 Years Ago appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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Today in Hip-Hop History: LL Cool J Dropped His Debut Album ‘Radio’ 34 Years Ago

On this date in 1985, James Todd Smith better known as LL Cool J dropped his first full-length LP on Def Jam Records. Primarily produced by Rick Rubin besides “I Need A Beat”, which was produced by DJ Jazzy Jay, Radio was a pivotal LP for not only LL and Def Jam, but for an evolving Hip Hop landscape that had just seen the rapid decline of b-boying and jams in the park. This was also the era in which the crack epidemic hit the streets and all of the major players used LL Cool J as the prototype image of how a hustler is supposed to look.

Songs like “I Can’t Live Without My Radio” and “Rock The Bells” dominated airwaves as well as influenced other artists of that time period with his braggadocios content and virtually forceful delivery. The song that actually got Cool J the deal with Def Jam, “I Need A Beat”, was written and recorded when LL was only 15 years old, making him not only Def Jam’s first solo artist but also their youngest.

Salute to Cool J, Rick Rubin, Russell Simmons, Jazzy Jay and everyone at Def Jam from that era that helped put together this timeless classic!

The post Today in Hip-Hop History: LL Cool J Dropped His Debut Album ‘Radio’ 34 Years Ago appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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Today In Hip Hop History: MF DOOM Dropped His Fifth LP ‘MM…FOOD’ 15 Years Ago

On this date in 2004, MF DOOM dropped his fifth full length studio release MM..FOOD. Put out on the underground Rhymesayers Entertainment label, some songs from the project were previously released under the name Madvillian on another label. The album featured classic samples from several superhero cartoons including the Fantastic Four, Spiderman and Superman.

The album featured production mainly from DOOM himself, with Count Bass D and Madlib on the help out on just two tracks on the 15 track project. Some of the standout tracks include “Hoe Cakes”, “Guinnesses”, which featured Tennessee born/ATL bred femcee Empress StaHHr and 4ize and the kaleidoscopic “Fig Leaf Bi-Carbonate”.

Salute to DOOM and everyone involved with this timeless album!

The post Today In Hip Hop History: MF DOOM Dropped His Fifth LP ‘MM…FOOD’ 15 Years Ago appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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SOURCE EXCLUSIVE: Tory Lanez Talks Chixtape 5, Resolving Misunderstanding With Roddy Ricch & Dream Doll’s Diss Track

Tory Lanez dropped off his highly-anticipated Chixtape 5 project, and fans are having all types of nostalgic feels after listening to their favorite artists from the 2000’s feature on samples of their own songs!

The Source Magazine joined forces with Sprayground to curate an exclusive, intimate fan experience with Tory Lanez ahead of the release of the project.

Fargo briefly touched on the disagreement he had with Roddy Ricch when the Compton rhymer accused him of biting his “Die Young” song. “When things like this happens with people like us who already worked together, I’m just expecting a phone call,” Tory added. “I’m not going to do that to an artist I admire. I think he’s really good.”

On the single he used the same beat, and spoke about losing a loved one. But the two artists were able to settle their differences and Tory reassured that there’s no issues between them.

He also spoke about his viral rap beef with Don Q and said they engaged in it for the “politic of the sport.” The host, Miss2Bees, asked him about his thoughts on Dream Doll’s response to him after he referenced her in his diss to the Highbridge rapper. “She was doing it because she was hurt by what I said.” He continued. “It would’ve been dope if the main dope things were real things. But for me as the listener, the way you put it down, and the way shorty wrote it for you is fire. Like the flow and the way you’re delivering it, super fire, A+. I’ve never even seen you spit like this.”

In other words, there’s no harsh feelings and they spoke about it afterwards.

A lucky fan had the opportunity to ask Tory how did the collaboration with T-Pain for the album’s single, “Jerry Sprunger” come about. “Originally I sent it to him but I showed him on a video shoot for another song we had together called ‘Getcha Roll On.’  So we worked together and at the video shoot I played him the song and he did it and sent it back.”

Fans have been reacting on Twitter since midnight.

Did you get a chance to listen to Chixtape 5 yet? What’s your favorite song on the project?

The post SOURCE EXCLUSIVE: Tory Lanez Talks Chixtape 5, Resolving Misunderstanding With Roddy Ricch & Dream Doll’s Diss Track appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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Happy Birthday ODB(RIP)! Top Five Most Memorable Ol’ Dirty Bastard Moments

On this day Hip-Hop history we celebrate the birth of one of the culture’s brightest stars, the late, great Russell Jones, affectionately known to the Hip-Hop world as Ol’ Dirty Bastard.

To Hip Hop, Dirt Dog was more than a rapper. His personality and ostentatious demeanor were representatives of the soul of Hip-Hop. He did not let the fame and status take away from his character. Those who knew him said that he remained true to himself throughout his career making him quite the public figure. According to some, Ol’ Dirty was the type to help an old woman cross the street then, once he got to the other side, run a bystander for his jewels. He was a noble man with a righteous cause for sinning. His legacy is one that will not fade anytime soon.

In honor of his 50th-degree day, we have put together a top-five list of some of Big Baby Jesus’ most outrageous and memorable moments and these aren’t the only ones to chose from.

Performing as a Fugitive of Justice

In the fall of 2000, ODB was facing two charges for drug possession and had two separate warrants out for his arrest. This didn’t case The Specialist to lose any sleep. He, in fact, took the stage at the Hammerstein Ballroom in New York performing exactly one verse before having to flee the scene. He even gave his fans a warning before gracing the mic saying, “I can’t stay on the stage too long tonight—the cops is after me.”

Taking a Limo to Pick Up Food Stamps

Who wouldn’t take advantage of the opportunity to pick up a government assistance check-in style, not ODB. In an MTV News interview, OL’ Dirty takes MTV and the viewers at home on a unique ride down to the welfare office in a fully-loaded stretch limo. If that wasn’t good enough, ODB’s response when asked why he is so blatantly making a mockery of the welfare system he responds, “[They] owe me 40 acres and a mule anyway.” Touche, Dirt Dog, touche.

Interrupting a Grammy Acceptance Speech

In 1998, way before Kanye embarrassed Taylor Swift on the VMA stage, ODB took to the stage to voice his opinion on Wu-Tang losing Best Rap Album to Puff Daddy & The Family’s No Way Out. Unfortunately for some, OBD didn’t make it on stage until Shawn Colvin was on stage making his acceptance speech for winning Song of the Year, much after the after Diddy was awarded his Grammy. In a few short moments, ODB expressed his frustration by saying,

“I went and bought me an outfit today that costed me a lot of money today because I figured Wu-Tang was going to win. I don’t know how y’all see it, but when to comes it to the children, Wu-Tang is for the children. We teach the children. Puffy is good, but Wu-Tang is the best. I want you to know that this is ODB, and I love you all.”

Giving an Interview for the Children with No Shoes on Outside

In one of his best interviews, ODB goes on a rant about being only for the children on the streets of Brooklyn, while barefoot. At first glance, it may seem strange, but if you think about it, the prophets of old were more than likely shoe-less. Trying to picture Jesus speaking to his disciples in a pair of crisp white Air Force Ones just isn’t right, maybe Big Baby was on to something.

Made video with Mariah Carey “Fantasy”

Just when you thought that there was only a “dirty version” to ODB, he opened up his soft side and collaborated with legendary songbird Mariah Carey for her “Fantasy” remix. Carey ended up being one of Dirty’s closest confidants, writing him letters of support during his two-year incarceration in upstate New York.

The post Happy Birthday ODB(RIP)! Top Five Most Memorable Ol’ Dirty Bastard Moments appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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Today in Hip-Hop History: The Beastie Boys Dropped Their ‘Licensed To Ill’ LP 33 Years Ago

On this date in 1986, Adam Horowitz (Ad Rock), Adam Yauch (MCA) and Michael Diamond (Mike D) aka The Beastie Boys, dropped their sophomore LP Licensed To Ill on the Def Jam Imprint under Columbia Records.

On the heels of the successful LL Cool J Radio album and the cult classic flick Krush Groove, Def Jam head honcho Russell Simmons decided to head in the most unconventional direction with the quasi-punk rock/Hip-Hop trio for Def Jam’s follow up to those monumental releases. The original title of this release was Don’t Be A Faggot, but Columbia Records pushed Simmons to change the homophobic title.

Rated as one of The Source Magazine‘s Top 100 Best Albums, Licensed To Ill received the coveted five-mic status, a precedent for Jewish Hip Hop artists. In less than six months after its release, this critically acclaimed project earned the Beastie Boys a platinum plaque, lead by the singles “Brass Monkey,” “No Sleep Til Brooklyn,” “Hold It Now, Hit It” and the storytelling smash “Paul Revere.”

Unfortunately, crew member MCA lost his battle with cancer in 2012, which actually caused a resurgence in the album’s popularity and sales.

Salute to Def Jam, Russell Simmons, Ad Rock, Mike D and the continued legacy of MCA for creating such a timeless Hip Hop classic!

The post Today in Hip-Hop History: The Beastie Boys Dropped Their ‘Licensed To Ill’ LP 33 Years Ago appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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Today in Hip-Hop History: Method Man’s Debut Album ‘Tical’ Turns 25 Years Old!

On this day in Hip-Hop history, Method Man released his debut solo LP Tical. Sticking to RZA’s plan on industry domination, Method was the first to roll out his solo LP after the ridiculous success group debut Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers). In the early years of the Wu, Method Man had grown become the public face of the group. His larger than life persona and a multitude of styles won over the hearts and ears of fans after the groups first single “Protect Ya Neck” had “Method Man” on it’s B-side.

Tical delves deeper into the sinister villainous style previewed on 36 Chambers. Method Man creates a dark anti-hero on this album who hungers for the career of wack rappers and perpetrators. It was truly a violent introduction to one of the most outrageous members of the Wu, second only to ODB in theatrical personality.

Considered a “two-man show” by critics, the album was almost entirely produced by RZA. As the Wu’s architect, RZA created specific sounds for each member. Method unique sonic was the most film inspired. Meth continued to build a character likened to the many crime bosses and master villains that starred in his beloved Kung-Fu flicks. Aside from the image, lyrically the album is on another level. Method Man flawlessly juggles synonyms and metaphors with a flow that weaves in and out of the beat to create a hardcore symphony of Shaolin style.

Commercially, the album was a hit and only added on to the cipher of success revolving around the Wu-Tang Clan. The album peaked at #4 on the Billboard 200 and #1 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop chart selling a million copies within a year of its release. It kick-started a wave of successful solo albums and keep afloat RZA’s five-year plan to becoming the greatest rap group in history.

The post Today in Hip-Hop History: Method Man’s Debut Album ‘Tical’ Turns 25 Years Old! appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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Today in Hip-Hop History: 2Pac Dropped His Debut Album ‘2Pacalypse Now’ 28 Years Ago

On this day in 1991, one of Hip-Hop’s brightest stars, Tupac Shakur, released his first studio album 2Pacalypse Now. Although it didn’t take the Billboard charts by storm upon its original release, it was the first of many albums that hold a place in the hearts of almost all fans of Hip-Hop across the world.

As far as content goes, this is easily Pac’s most politically influenced album. From the opening single, “Young Black Male,” the listener can tell how 2Pac felt about the circumstances facing his people in 1991. The rest of the album follows that aggressive poetic style. Although this approach to the industry wasn’t one that gave him a jump start like the radio heavy songs of his competition during that era, it did hold truth and leave a mark on those that heard it. The lack of commercial success of this album came from its lack of a true radio single. The most popular song on the album, Brenda’s Got a Baby, did reach a peak position of 11 on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles and Tracks chart in 1992, the subject matter and lack of hook made it a hard song to flood the airwaves with.

This was not an album for the radio; it was an album for the people. It still is. The nearly 20-year-old Tupac Shakur was trying to talk to his bruised and battered people in the ghettos of America. He took the opportunity of his platform to showcase his poetic ability and address a country that he felt still needed to be addressed on the subject of racism and discrimination. This activist mindset became a theme throughout his career as he became more outspoken about the oppression of Blacks in America until his untimely death in 1997. From this project came the career of a man who has been argued to be the greatest rapper of all time. And whether that is certain or not, the fact still remains that this album started a legacy and we should all take some time to pay homage to the Thug who was taken from us too soon.

The post Today in Hip-Hop History: 2Pac Dropped His Debut Album ‘2Pacalypse Now’ 28 Years Ago appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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Today in Hip-Hop History: Timbaland and Magoo Release Their First Collaborative LP ‘Welcome to Our World’ 22 Years Ago

On this day in 1997, the Norfolk, Virginia based duo of producing legend Timbaland and rapper Magoo released their first studio album Welcome To Our World. For a debut album, this LP was widely successful, going platinum during the first year of its release. Welcome To Our World also led to the relationship that Timbaland built with DeVante Swing, which jumpstarted his career to superstardom.

This album is a classic among all-rap duos in Hip Hop history. Down in the Seven Cities/Hampton Roads area, Timbaland was already well known as a producer working with artists like Missy Elliot and Ginuwine who are also from Virginia and, at the time, rising star Aaliyah. The release of this particular album only fueled the fire of their local success to set them off toward greater things.

Welcome to Our World was very popular on the HBCU circuit and gave Timbaland and Magoo opportunities to perform at homecomings and other parties on campuses in the Southeast. The promotional success of this album even got it a peaking spot of 33rd on the Billboard 200 in 1997. The album also gave way to three hit singles: “Up Jump da Boogie”, which peaked at #12 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #1 on the Billboard Hot Rap Singles chart, “Clock Strikes” featuring VA ghostwriter Madd Skillz, and “Luv 2 Luv Ya”. After this project, Timbaland and Magoo dropped two more successful studio LPs.

The post Today in Hip-Hop History: Timbaland and Magoo Release Their First Collaborative LP ‘Welcome to Our World’ 22 Years Ago appeared first on The Source | The Magazine of Hip Hop Music,Culture and Politics.

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