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Up In The Source: Looking Back at The Notorious B.I.G.’s Covers of ‘The Source Magazine’

Happy would-be 47th birthday, Biggie!

On May 21, 1972, Voletta Wallace gave birth to Christopher George Latore Wallace, the future Hip-Hop icon that we’d all go on to know and love by many aka’s — The Notorious B.I.G., Biggie Smalls, Biggie or the undisputed King of New York are usually thrown around most frequently.

On what would’ve been his 47th birthday today, it’s not hard to imagine all the things the Brooklyn-born MC would’ve achieved had his life not been ended just two-and-a-half months short of his 25th birthday. However, what he was able to accomplish in just 24 years will always be considered astounding to say the least. Two multiplatinum albums — the latter, Life After Death, even went on to achieve Diamond certification — managing a successful crew of MCs with Junior M.A.F.I.A., jumpstarting the career of a pioneering female rap solo star with Lil’ Kim, making Bad Boy the Hip-Hop record label of the ’90s alongside Puff Daddy and ultimately putting on Brooklyn in a way that still resonates from Canarsie to his beginnings in Bed-Stuy.

Biggie had an amazing relationship with The Source during his lifetime, from that notorious shoutout on “Juicy” to appearing on our cover twice before he died and multiple times in the years that followed. Today we look back on our old pal B.I.G., who by now would’ve for sure been sitting comfortably on the throne as a Hip-Hop king alongside guys like Jay-Z, Nas and Dr. Dre to name a few.

Take a look at all the times The Notorious B.I.G. was “up in” The Source. We’re sure Ms. Wallace is still smiling:


Original “The Last Word” artwork by Andre LeRoy Davis for Biggie’s first cover of The Source (Issue #70; July ’95).


JULY 1995 – The Notorious B.I.G. lands his first cover of The Source and is officially deemed “The King of New York”

Looking larger than life and standing in-between the Twin Towers, making for a photo that has now become an eerie coincidence, Biggie was at the top of his game when this cover dropped in summer 1995. The “Young, Rich & Deadly” story was helmed by OG Source writer Bönz Malone with imagery spearheaded by equally legendary photographer Chi Modu, and it’s still an extremely proud moment for us as a brand and Hip-Hop culture in general.


The Source Issue #70 (July 1995)


APRIL 1997 – The Notorious B.I.G. lands his last cover of The Source while alive

Jeff “Chairman” Mao got one of the last interviews with Biggie before he was killed on March 9, 1997, making this cover story both a profound piece of rap history and a somber memory as well. The story focused on his place at the top of the rap world after helping to bring Hip-Hop mainstream, which at the time was both a gift and curse. Many felt that although he was giving the genre some well-deserved attention on a mass level, it still was at the expense of abandoning that core street element. Life After Death was going to be his answer to the haters by proving he could do it all, commercial and hood hits alike, and we just wish he’d lived to see it all come to fruition.


The Source Issue #91 (April 1997)


MAY 1997 – The Notorious B.I.G. covers The Source again, this time way more bittersweet.

Tribute covers will never truly be something to celebrate. Sure, paying homage and giving a recently-deceased person the attention they deserve is beautiful in its intentions, but it honestly just shouldn’t have gone down this way. From a well-deserved Five Mics review for Life After Death to an unforgettable Hip-Hop Quotable from “Kick In The Door,” the whole issue was in honor of a guy who was supposed to be our future. This one will forever be a sore spot for our staff and the Hip-Hop community overall.


The Source Issue #92 (May 1997)


JANUARY 2006 – The Notorious B.I.G. continues to lives on.

Anytime you start a new year, reflections of the past will always come rushing back. To jumpstart that year, we gave the cover to Biggie and three other rap icons we’d lost at that point, including 2Pac, Eazy-E and Big Pun. Stylized in the form of stained glass figures, each man paved a way for rap to become the juggernaut that it grew into by 2006. A fitting tribute, for sure.


The Source Issue #195 (January 2006)


FEBRUARY 2007 – Biggie’s presence is still felt 10 years after his passing for a special Collectors Edition Issue.

After losing this icon a full decade prior, The Source felt necessary to give him the ultimate honor with a full tribute issue dedicated to his memory and contributions to rap. Even though it’s been an additional 10 years or so since this issue dropped, the feeling remains the same: we’ll always love Big Poppa.


The Source Issue #207 (February 2007)


DECEMBER 2008 – Biggie’s life story hits the B.I.G. screen in our special Notorious biopic issue.

Biggie had become such an icon to the world by this point, even surpassing the realms of rap, that his life story was long overdue for a biographical film. Notorious was released by Fox Searchlight Pictures in January 2009, and this special Collectors Issue was there to editorialize the story with background info to the stories told throughout the film. Give this movie a watch today to see why his memory, just like he raps on “Nasty Boy,” goes on and on and on and…


The Source Issue #228 (December 2008)


Happy would-be birthday B.I.G.! Let us know what track you guys are spinning by hitting us on Facebook and Twitter!

The post Up In The Source: Looking Back at The Notorious B.I.G.’s Covers of ‘The Source Magazine’ appeared first on The Source.

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Today In Hip Hop History: Gang Starr’s Critically Acclaimed LP ‘Daily Operation’ Dropped 27 Years Ago

Nothing beats a classic rap record, and few MCs were dropping them on the regular quite like legendary ’90s rap duo Gang Starr. The group, consisting of Guru holding things down on the mic and DJ Premier handling the head-bumping production, dropped six albums in their career before calling it quits in 2003. While a reunion album was reportedly planned, unfortunately Guru passed away on April 19, 2010 before the project could be completed or properly executed overall. While the Hip-Hop community definitely took a blow due to the loss, the work they did create while recording together influenced the genre in ways that we’re still seeing today. One LP that specifically represents Gang Starr’s influential legacy is their third album Daily Operation, which celebrates its 27th anniversary today.


Chrysalis Records


Comprised of jazz-tinged samples and lyrics that illustrated life in the streets of New York City during the early ’90s, Daily Operation saw Gang Starr striding smoothly towards the legendary status that we now place the group in today. The project is East Coast inspired through and through, from recording the LP entirely at the dearly missed D&D Studios on West 37th Street in Midtown Manhattan all the way to lamenting about Brooklyn on the opening track “The Place We Dwell.” Other standout cuts include “I’m The Man,” featuring the sole credited cameos by Group Home member Lil Dap and Jeru the Damaja, “B.Y.S.” — cleverly abbreviated for “Bust Yo’ Shit” — and the lead single “Ex Girl to Next Girl” that gave us one of the most 90s-looking music video ever created.



The key to Gang Starr is that, while none of their albums ever crossed Top 5 status on the Billboard 200 — their highest placement happened in 1998 when Moment of Truth hit #6 — sales were never the thing that represented their affect on the game; the music always came first and foremost. Daily Operation received all sorts of critical acclaim nonetheless, and we even included it on our “100 Best Rap Albums” list for The Source‘s 100th issue (January 1998). So, while it only reached #65 on the Billboard 200 and faired slightly better on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart at #14, those numbers mean nothing when compared to the slick verses, smooth-yet-rugged instrumentals and thought-provoking bars that still makes this album a certified classic almost three decades after its original release.



Give Daily Operation by Gang Starr a spin today to celebrate the album’s 27th anniversary, and also read our original review of the album from The Source Issue #33 (June 1992) below:

The post Today In Hip Hop History: Gang Starr’s Critically Acclaimed LP ‘Daily Operation’ Dropped 27 Years Ago appeared first on The Source.

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Somar Jafari, Kayla Irizarry Take Titles in Red Bull’s BC One Cypher Orlando

With breaking as arguably one of the most competitive pillars of Hip Hop culture, it’s not surprising that Red Bull’s BC One Cypher Tournament in Orlando, Florida was the location of one of the culture’s fiercest b-boy battles this weekend.

Powered by the energy drink’s b-boy/b-girl initiative to inspire and motivate a new generation to embrace the original dance aspect of Hip Hop culture, the BC One Cypher’s Orlando stop was packed with informative workshops, a couch session with b-boy and Hip Hop living legend Crazy Legs and ultra-competitive battles in which the winners will move on to the finals, which is slated for May 17-19 in Houston, Texas at Camp BC One.

Judged by Red Bull breakers Roxrite, Ronnie, Crazy Legs and others, top contenders that were invited from past events competed alongside breakers who walked in off the street and wowed the crowd in the initial qualifying rounds. After a challenging qualifying round for the b-boys and the b-girls as well as a three-round elimination tournament for the top 16 breakers.

When the smoke cleared, Kayla Irizarry took the title to represent for the ladies in Houston while Somar Jafari came through with no invitation and shut it down, taking his win to H-Town to rep for the b-boys.

Next stop for the BC One Tourney will be in the City of Brotherly Love scheduled for May 9-11. Stay tuned to TheSource.com for more info about the BC One Tournament and its initiative.

The post Somar Jafari, Kayla Irizarry Take Titles in Red Bull’s BC One Cypher Orlando appeared first on The Source.

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Today in Hip-Hop History: Bone Crusher Debuted 16 Years Ago With ‘AttenCHUN!’

“I ain’t never scared!”

Say that phrase to any longtime rap fan, and the response will either be “East Side!” if you’re anywhere near New York, “West Side!” if Cali vibes are your wave, “South Side!” for the ATLiens out there or “North Side!” if you’re, well, Drake. All jokes aside though, the term will forever be burned in our collective Hip-Hop conscience thanks to Wayne Hardnett Jr., better known to the world as Atlanta-bred rapper Bone Crusher.

Today we decided to take it back to 2003, as the early ’00s Hip-Hop star released his debut album AttenCHUN! 16 years ago today.


So So Def/Arista


The aforementioned Avery Johnson-produced lead single “Never Scared” is still a staple in locker rooms across the nation as a classic get-hype pregame song — the “Football Remix” was even featured in Madden 2004. It eventually would become a Top 4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 (#26), as well as a top 10 hit on the Rap chart at #6. The album has other gems featured on it as well though, including the equally hyphy “Lock & Load” intro, head-thumping “Sound The Horn” and the smooth deep cut “Peaches & Cream” among other tracks. The album, released under So So Def/Arista and produced entirely by Jermaine Dupri, also has a heavy list of heavy hitters featured throughout, including T.I., Killer Mike, David Banner, Goodie Mob and JD on an intro for the obvious standout song. Speaking of “Never Scared” (again), there’s also the fire “Takeover Remix” featuring an all-star roundup that includes Cam’ron, Jadakiss and Busta Rhymes — in that order — representing for the “EAST SIDE!!!”

The album proved to be a major success in 2003, peaking in the top 20 on the Billboard 200 charts at #11 and topping the R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart as well. Although many felt that the album was weighed down with too many interludes or that the production started to get repetitive — i.e. an album full of “Never Scared”-sounding b-sides — the album as a whole seamed together perfectly to make for one truly energy-inducing LP.

While AttenCHUN! proved to be Bone Crusher’s only hit album, releasing just two more albums before going silent in 2007, The Source along with everyone who’s ever played Def Jam: Fight for NY will always remember the guy who helped define crunk rap. Salute to the king!

Happy 16th anniversary to AttenCHUN! by Bone Crusher! Stream it today for a good ’03 throwback, and watch the classic music video for “Never scared” below:

The post Today in Hip-Hop History: Bone Crusher Debuted 16 Years Ago With ‘AttenCHUN!’ appeared first on The Source.

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The Best Rap T-Shirts Spotted at Coachella 2019

The annual Coachella Festival is one of the greatest live music events of the year, and The Source was on grounds for Weekend 1 to take in all that three days of rap, rock, R&B and everything in between had to offer. While performances are always the highlight of the occasion, nothing compares to the fashion that you’ll spot while jumping from stage to stage.



Jay-Z, Hard Knock Life Tour (1999)
Spotted: De La Soul set, Heineken House


Since Coachella does festival style like no other, we had to test the Hip-Hop knowledge on the scene to see who was properly representing for the culture. Rap tees seemed like the best area to focus on, and we definitely peeped some good ones — vintage De La Soul for the ’80s heads, Hard Knock Life Tour-era Jay-Z for ’90s kids and the absolute standout of them all that mixed early 2000s rap with the infamous Fyre Fest of today — sorry, Ja Rule! — as worn by the brilliant and clearly hilarious Questlove of The Roots. Check for that one specifically above, but the rest that we spotted all weekend long are pretty fresh as well.

Keep scrolling for a style-driven trek through Weekend 1 of Coachella 2019, and see if you can name the era, album or even the year of each rap T-shirt we came across:


De La Soul, ‘3 Feet High and Rising’ (1989)
Spotted: De La Soul set, Heineken House



Snoop Dogg by Topman
Spotted: The Roots set, Heineken House



Lauryn Hill, ‘The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill’ (1998)
Spotted: Republic Records offsite party, Zenyara



Drake, Assassination Vacation Tour (2019)
Spotted: YG set, Sahara stage



Childish Gambino, exclusive Coachella 2019 merch (2019)
Spotted: YG set, Sahara stage



Tupac x VLONE (2017)
Spotted: YG set, Sahara stage



Death Row Records (1991)
Spotted: YG set, Sahara stage



Kanye West, ‘Yeezus’ Tour (2013)
Spotted: Coachella Ferris Wheel



Travis Scott, ‘ASTROWORLD: Wish You Were Here’ Tour (2018)
Spotted: Lil Pump / Gucci Gang set, Sahara stage



YG, “4Hunnid Pro League” Bowling Shirt by Zumies
Spotted: Gucci Mane & Quavo / Gucci Gang set, Sahara stage



Travis Scott, ‘ASTROWORLD: Wish You Were Here’ Tour (2019)
Spotted: Gucci Mane / Gucci Gang set, Sahara stage



Kanye West, ‘College Dropout’ (2004)
Spotted: Idris Elba DJ set, Yuma tent



Mac Miller, R.I.P. (2018)
Spotted: H.E.R. set, Outdoor Theatre



Snoop Dogg by Urban Outfitters (2016)
Spotted: En route to Kaytranada, Mojave stage



Kanye West, Saint Pablo Tour (2016)
Spotted: H.E.R. set, Outdoor Theatre



Nipsey Hussle, R.I.P. (2019)
Spotted: Ariana Grande set, Coachella Stage



Images: Keenan Higgins / The Source

The post The Best Rap T-Shirts Spotted at Coachella 2019 appeared first on The Source.

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Today In Hip Hop History: West Coast Legend Spice 1 Drops Self-Titled Debut LP 27 Years Ago

Whether you’re hanging in Coachella Valley or simply mourning the loss of Crenshaw’s fallen hero Nipsey Hussle like the rest of us, West Coast Rap is definitely being bumped at high volumes this weekend. That’s why we had to show some love to the Hayward homie Spice 1 on this lovely Sunday, which happens to fall on the 27th anniversary of his debut self-titled album.


Jive


Two years before appearing alongside MC Eiht and Scarface on our June ’94 cover (Issue #57), the rapper born Robert Lee Green Jr. delivered this banger for the Bay Area, which went on to reach way beyond his hood. The album was a big label follow-up to his well-received street EP Let It Be Known, which sold almost 100K in pure sales as an independent release. Once Jive came into the picture, the seven-song project was re-released and retitled as Spice 1, including five songs from the original project in addition to nine new ones. The switch up paid off, with the revamped version giving us the classic cut “Welcome to the Ghetto” and going on to sell almost half a million records.



The tracks on Spice 1 sound like quintessential G-Funk, translated through singles like “187 Proof” and the reggae-tinged “East Bay Gangster,” all the way to deep cuts like “Peace to My Nine” and the low-rider classic “City Streets.” It’s clear to see his style & delivery is inspired by the rap icon that discovered him — Spice 1 hails from Oakland’s The Dangerous Crew created by Too $hort — but the connection is less “flow biting” and more “of the same kin.” At the end of the day, it all just sounds like good gangsta rap.



The initial success of the album helped it rank in the top 20 of Billboard’s R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart at #14, later achieving gold certification by RIAA. “Welcome to the Ghetto” proved to be a hit as well, rising to #39 on the Hot R&B/Hip Hop Singles & Tracks chart and also appearing on the Hot Rap Singles where it faired the best at #5. It ultimately marked a good start to a career that would go on to produce 12 studio albums and more than a handful of compilation LPs and collab albums, the latest being as recent as 2015 with his Bossolo-assisted project Thug Therapy.



We crowned him as one of the 115 greatest MCs from 1988 to 2003 for our 15th anniversary (Issue #167), and we stand by that sentiment as he rings in 27 years of his debut project. The Bay Area is home to an important sound and time in Hip-Hop, and Spice 1 helped cultivate that. Salute, king!

Happy 27th anniversary to Spice 1’s debut album! Let us know which tracks you’re bumping today by hitting us on Facebook and Twitter, and read the Spice 1 review we penned back in June 1992 for The Source Issue #33 below:

The post Today In Hip Hop History: West Coast Legend Spice 1 Drops Self-Titled Debut LP 27 Years Ago appeared first on The Source.

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Today in Hip Hop History: Mobb Deep Dropped Their Debut Album ‘Juvenile Hell’ 26 Years Ago

You wouldn’t be blamed for thinking Mobb Deep’s near-perfect album The Infamous… was their debut project, especially given it’s well-deserved critical acclaim over the years. However, the East Coast rap duo actually popped up on the scene a whole two years prior with Juvenile Hell on April 13, 1993, and today we’re looking back on the rookie rap offering on the LP’s 26th anniversary.


4th & B’way/Island/PolyGram Records


Way before blessing us with “Shook Ones” and “Survival of the Fittest,” Kejuan Muchita and Albert Johnson — you may known them better as Havoc and Prodigy, respectively — were just two teens from NYC trying to make their mark in the rap game. The group had just changed their name to Mobb Deep after spending the prior year as “Poetical Prophets,” the name they’d get their first taste of fame under in our own Unsigned Hype section circa July 1991 for The Source #22 (see below). The album was distributed through 4th & B’way Records, the label Eric B. & Rakim saw success with five years prior on their classic debut Paid in Full, and was supported by the singles “Peer Pressure” and “Hit It from the Back.” Although the album didn’t take off with either single, it set the guys up with a rugged sound they could perfect & make a blueprint out of to come back and dominate just a few years later.


Mobb Deep’s first appearance in The Source, back when the 16-year-old duo went by “Poetical Prophets.” (Issue #22; July 1991)


Even without critical or fan-supported success, Juvenile Hell still had its gems. From the Big Noyd-assisted “Stomp Em Out,” with its jazzy sample and call-out style chorus, to “Flavor for the Non Believes,” which recalls their Poetical Prophets days demo tape Flavor for the Nonbelievers, each track is a sonically-authentic product of the boom bap era at its peak. The sole charting single, “Hit It from the Back,” even made it to #18 on the Billboard Hot Rap Singles. Above everything though, this was Prodigy and Havoc’s first time showing the world that they could produce just as well as they rap, which of course we’d see them show off on an even greater scale later in the group’s career.



Overall, Juvenile Hell will always be remembered as the start of a Hip-Hop legacy that will continue on even in the absence of Prodigy, who sadly passed away a few years ago on June 20, 2017 due to complications from his lifelong battle with sickle cell. Through albums like this one, as well as The Infamous…, Hell On Earth and Infamy among others, his legacy will continue to live on and the group will always be seen as legends to the game.

Celebrate the 26th anniversary of Mobb Deep’s debut album Juvenile Hell by giving it a spin today, and let us know some of your favorite tracks by hitting us on Facebook and Twitter! Also, read the original review from The Source Issue #45 (June 1993) below:

The post Today in Hip Hop History: Mobb Deep Dropped Their Debut Album ‘Juvenile Hell’ 26 Years Ago appeared first on The Source.

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Today in Hip Hop History: Scarface Drops His Compilation LP ‘Balls and My Word’ 16 Years Ago

Since beginning his solo career in 1990 while still serving as a core member of the Geto Boys, rap legend Scarface has always been tied to the 1983 classic crime film of the same name. While always embodying a certain kingpin status in the rap game, similar to the way Tony Montana had things on lock in his fictitious 1980s Miami setting, the rapper knew how to separate his real life from the one Oliver Stone created for Al Pacino. That all changed with the album cover and opening sample on Balls and My Word, Scarface’s second compilation LP released by Rap-A-Lot Records 16 years ago today.


Rap-A-Lot Records


Released just six months after his first Greatest Hits album in 2002, Balls and My Word sounded more like a “greatest hits you’ve never heard” record. Unreleased cuts from past projects are pieced together for this project, including the title track which was pulled from Geto Boys’ obscure 1988 debut album Making Trouble. Even though some of the tracks here are borrowed from Face’s prior discography — standout cut “Make Your Peace” shares some similarities to “Heaven” off his 2002 Def Jam South debut The Fix — the raps, production and overall content are right on the money and are seamlessly structured to where you can’t immediately tell that these aren’t new.



The album didn’t come without it’s controversies though. As mentioned before, Scarface was rolling with Def Jam by the time this record dropped, and actually had nothing to do with it altogether. Balls and My Word was primarily handled by Rap-A-Lot CEO J. Prince while Scarface was serving as head of opps at Def Jam South, and as a result the project didn’t really get the shine it could’ve gotten if the guy on the cover was actually promoting it. However, the LP did manage to reach top 20 on the Billboard 200 and included features from vets like Devin the Dude and Bun B. The latter artist appears on the album’s most controversial cut “Bitch Nigga,” which features Houston rapper Z-Ro throwing what many reported at the time to be shots at 2002’s biggest MC at the time, 50 Cent.



Ultimately, while it wasn’t a successful cash grab for Prince and Rap-A-Lot, neither did it birth a hit single as catchy as “My Block” or classic as the Kanye-produced track “Guess Who’s Back” featuring Jay-Z and Beanie Sigel, Balls and My Word had some great moments strictly because it’s filled with rare Face records. What more could you ask for as a hardcore Hip-Hop fan?



Give Balls and My Word by Scarface a full spin above as we celebrate it on the 16th anniversary of its release, and let us know your favorite cuts by hitting us on Facebook and Twitter!

The post Today in Hip Hop History: Scarface Drops His Compilation LP ‘Balls and My Word’ 16 Years Ago appeared first on The Source.

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Today in Hip Hop History: M.O.P. Drops Their Debut Album ‘To the Death’ 25 Years Ago

April 5 is an interesting day in Hip-Hop music. Rarely is a rap record released on this day — we did the research, but feel free to prove us wrong! — but there was one influential LP that jumpstarted the careers of two Brownsville natives and competely shook the game up in 1994. Yes, we’re talking about the Mash Out Posse, who you may know better as M.O.P., and today we show them love as their debut album To The Death turns 25.


Select Street Records


Released on April 5, 1994, To The Death was yet another milestone in the domination that New York had on the rap game, with Lil’ Fame and Billy Danze both representing Brooklyn with the ruggedness and street appeal that shaped the attitude, look and overall sound of Hip-Hop at this time. The album itself was a precursor for rappers like Nas (Illmatic), Outkast (Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik), Da Brat (Funkdafied) and The Notorious B.I.G. (Ready to Die) amongst others that also debuted in 1994, with M.O.P. coming out swinging with three singles and a modest peak at #68 on the US Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart.



The album was produced entirely by legendary East Coast rap producer and fellow Brownsville native DR Period, aside from the closing track “Guns N Roses” which was handled by Silver D and executive producer creds going to silent M.O.P. member Laze E Laze. The musical themes highlight the climate of life in hoods throughout America in the ’90s — gang violence, “fake ass gangstas,” staying fresh and just surviving the “rugged neva smoove” streets of New York City.



Of all the singles released off this shining debut, the highlight would of course be the anthem cut “How About Some Hardcore.” It was the most successful performance on the charts and amongst the hardest of Hip-Hop fans, peaking in the Top 40 on the US Hot Rap Songs chart at #36. For those that liked it raw, M.O.P. provided that effortlessly on this record with impressive lyricism, dope production and a tenacity to make it big that we’d see the duo accomplish even greater on the DJ Premier-produced follow up album and the 2001 smash hit “Ante Up (Remix).” And to think: all of this originated from a chance standout appearance on the soundtrack to House Party 3!



Happy 25th anniversary to M.O.P.’s debut album To The Death! Tell us your favorite tracks over on Facebook and Twitter after reading the original album review featured in The Source Magazine Issue No. 56 (May 1994) below:

The post Today in Hip Hop History: M.O.P. Drops Their Debut Album ‘To the Death’ 25 Years Ago appeared first on The Source.

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Afropunk Announces 2019 Brooklyn Festival Lineup Including Jill Scott, Santigold, FKA Twigs, Danny Brown And More

AFROPUNK, the world-renowned festival and movement, has announced the lineup for its critically acclaimed, weekend-long, annual celebration, AFROPUNK BROOKLYN, which will take place on August 24 and 25 at Commodore Barry Park in Brooklyn, NY. AFROPUNK BROOKLYN’s 2019 edition continues to display one of the most exciting and inclusive festival lineups in the world. Headlining the festival this year are Jill Scott, FKA Twigs and Kamasi Washington; with additional performances by Gary Clark Jr. Santigold, Lianne La Havas, Danny Brown. Toro Y Moi, Death Grips, J.I.D, Leikeli47, Rico Nasty, Tierra Whack, IMDDB and many others (full lineup below).

The festival has expanded around the world in five cities, Paris, Johannesburg, London and Atlanta, with additional cities on the horizon. Beyond the constellation of large-scale, live-music events, AFROPUNK is a world-wide community that is the engine of the global Black experience. AFROPUNK festivals are gathering places to experience art, food and craft-makers and vendors. AFROPUNK is where the global majority comes to see and be seen, to speak loudly and proudly, to resist and party – but most of all, to make the future.

As has become custom, AFROPUNK has created an annual theme for the festivals: this year, it’s WE SEE YOU, a message that brings together AFROPUNK ideology and the people who support it, under the banner of acknowledgement, in resistance to those who strive to oppress.

The post Afropunk Announces 2019 Brooklyn Festival Lineup Including Jill Scott, Santigold, FKA Twigs, Danny Brown And More appeared first on The Source.

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