Tag Archives: rakim

Look: Just Blaze Had A Chance Encounter W/ Rap Icon Rakim At Cousin’s B-Day Party – “I’m Like, ‘That Looks Like Rakim…’”

Just Blaze Pic

Roc-A-Fella Records alumni Just Blaze is giving people a reason to venture out to family parties. The hip-hop hitmaker went to Instagram Sunday to reveal how an innocent appearance at his cousin’s birthday party turned into a legendary rap moment.

The post Look: Just Blaze Had A Chance Encounter W/ Rap Icon Rakim At Cousin’s B-Day Party – “I’m Like, ‘That Looks Like Rakim…'” appeared first on SOHH.com.

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Exclusive: Here’s Your First Look at the Cover For Rakim’s New Memoir ‘Sweat The Technique’

When anyone who respects and understands the culture of Hip-Hop refers to Rakim as “The God MC,” there’s never any real debate to challenge that bestowment. The reason? He literally is the greatest lyricist of all time and would have no problem proving that today in or out the booth, on or off the stage, at the wise age of 51 years old.

However, if you still need a crash course on his legendary stature in the rap game, all you have to do is read his new memoir, Sweat The Technique: Revelations On Creativity From The Lyrical Genius, which The Source is exclusively unveiling the cover for today.

Amistad Press / HarperCollins Publishers

As the official description states, Sweat the Technique is a “part memoir, part writing guide” penned by the rap pioneer alongside seasoned journalist Touré. The book details how Rakim influenced and even changed the way rappers actually rhymed, his intrinsic skills that helped make a certified classic debut album alongside Eric B. with their 1987 magnum opus Paid in Full and ultimately his journey from a young Black man hailing from Long Island with nothing but a dream and talent into the most respected MC of his era.

So, why now? Sure there’s a market for rap memoirs at the moment — JAY-Z’s classic Decoded, Common’s eye-opening Let Love Have the Last Word and My Famous Life by the late Prodigy of Mobb Deep are all gems — but what makes this moment so special for Rakim? We’ll leave it to the man himself to tell it via this exclusive quote he gave us to go with the cover reveal:

“Why now for ‘Sweat The Technique‘? There’s been a lot of points of reflection in my life over the last couple of years. I turned 50; my first album turned 30. I’ve welcomed some new editions to my family and lost some beloved ones. I got back together with my partner Eric to tour and release a box set and, while we were doing interviews, the same questions all seemed to come up. A lot of those questions were rehashes of some issues that I wanted to finally speak about and, more importantly, almost none of them covered what my fans and supporters are always asking….which is pretty much ‘How do you do it?’ It made sense to put a little focus on the craft and where I, and hopefully the readers, can search for inspiration. After over three decades of being an artist who mostly speaks through his music, the time felt right to pull back the curtain.”

Rakim, The God MC

Get your reading glasses out — this one definitely sounds like it will make for a good read! Sweat The Technique: Revelations On Creativity From The Lyrical Genius, the prolific new memoir by Rakim, goes on sale starting September 24.

Take a #ThrowbackThursday moment with us by watching our Source TV interview with The God MC from 2010 below:

The post Exclusive: Here’s Your First Look at the Cover For Rakim’s New Memoir ‘Sweat The Technique’ appeared first on The Source.

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Rakim Believes Smack Evolved Hip-Hop With Battle Rap

What would happen when your favorite rapper’s favorite rapper says you elevated the game?

Would you be at a loss for words or would that make you work that much harder?

In light of their last two cards, Resolution and NOME 9, dominating the rap conversation for close to three months… Rakim Allah aka the 18th Letter has weighed in on how important Troy “SMACK” White and URL are to the Hip-Hop as a culture.

READ MORE: NOME9 Proves That There Are Levels To This Rapping Stuff

“I remember when URL was S.M.A.C.K. DVDs and it started hitting the streets back in the early 2000s.  You used to [have to] pull up on 125th, and grab a copy or someone would hit you with it backstage at a show.” The Microphone Fiend reflects   “Watching it brought me straight back to the parks and parties where we all started.  I’m known as a lyricist but, like every great rapper I know, my lyricism was born trying to out rhyme the guy next to me in front of a handful of onlookers.”
The god-emcee has always noted that “iron sharpens iron.” Many have heard Rakim give praises to other emcees in the past. Most notably he has given props to Nasir Jones aka Nas as one of those who carry of the culture. But Nas is another rapper and depending on who you ask, is represents an older generation. And while he has evolutionized the game from a lyrical perspective… who has caused a paradigm shift for this new generation, ultimately saving the culture?

It seems like he is pointing to SMACK URL as an enterprise.
“The evolution URL [and battle rap] is like the evolution of Hip-Hop.” Rakim offers “It’s a little slicker now, it’s got the global reach of the internet, and the networks bringing it to the mass audiences.”
He continues, “So the rappers [on his platform] know the stakes have risen, and [one battle] can make or break a career overnight.” When Rakim used to battle in the park, your pride and maybe a couple of dollars were at the price you paid if you loss a battle. But what Smack White, Eric Beasley and their other partner Cheeko at the helm, their team Norbes, P, KD and NuNu as strong support systems, has done seems to have taken the tradition of battling and advanced it. Rakim sees what they they are doing with this platform and appreciates him for keeping this energy alive.
Rakim states, “That core energy of two artists elevating each other, and trying show the world that they are the biggest beast in the land… that’s always gonna be the real heart of what we do.”

The post Rakim Believes Smack Evolved Hip-Hop With Battle Rap appeared first on The Source.

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New York City Council Honors Artists and Influencers At The Power & Music Awards For Black Music Month

Before making Black Music Month an official happening in 1979,  musicologists and on-air radio personalities, Dyana Williams and Ed Wright, and producer extraordinaire Kenny Gamble, had to take their advocacy up Capitol Hill and lobby President Jimmy Cater to formally recognize the cultural and financial contributions of Black music in the world. And over the last 40 years, after this serious consideration, Black music has emerged the dominant musical genre in the world. To be more specific, the urban music called “Hip-Hop” is the most listened to music on earth.

In acknowledgement and celebration of those who have impacted the culture of Black music, the Power of Music with the support of New York City Council Member Andy King (12th Council District in the Bronx) and the New York Black, Latino & Asian Caucus hosted the Power & Music Awards to show a spotlight on legends in this industry.

The Honorees are as follows:

  • Rakim received the Musical Authenticity Award
  • April Walker received Fashion Icon Award
  • Big Daddy Kane received the Entertainment Lifestyle Award
  • Slick Rick received the Genesis Award
  • June Ambrose received Universal Style Award
  • Larry Blackmon from Cameo received the Music Trailblazer Award
  • Hezekiah Walker received the Power of Inspiration Award
  • Laurieann Gibson received the Power of Movement Award
  • Rick James posthumously received the Maverick Award
  • The Breakfast Club (DJ Envy, Charlamagne Tha God and Angela Yee) received the Voice of Influence Award
  • L. Londell McMillan, Chairman of The NorthStar Group & owner of The Source, received Entertainment Ambassador Award

Special Mention was given to Val Young and The Mary Jane Girls.

The dj for the night was the incomparable Chuck Chill-Out.

The Power & Music Awards was founded in 2018 by Media Leacock, Norman ‘Storm’ Bell, Mark Spark Welch and Shana Melius.

 

The post New York City Council Honors Artists and Influencers At The Power & Music Awards For Black Music Month appeared first on The Source.

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Kwamé Says That Hurby “Luv Bug” Slept On Rakim and Big Daddy Kane

Rapper, producer, label owner, concert promoter and Founder of The Alumni, Kwamé Holland is one of the hardest working rappers from the Golden Era. He is recently took a break from touring and producing hit records for R&B artists and made waves with a revelation about his former boss, Hurby “Luv Bug” Azor’s nose for sniffing out legends.

On The Soren Baker Show while talking about his career, he dropped a little gem the is sure to knock anyone who loved 80s Hip-Hop to the ground.

The first gem was about how his debut album, The Boy Genius, got made.

Though he grew up with Hurby Luv Bug, he was taking too long to produce a demo for the then teenaged Kwamé. Upon referral from a mutual friend, he went to a spot called The Music Building and cut his first joint. He produced a song entitled, “She’s Not Just Another Woman.” No one liked this song. He went back to the drawing board. The day was Christmas morning… and that’s how hit songs like “The Rhythm” and “The Mic is Mine” on that magical night. Six of the eight songs on that debut album was made in that 8 hour session. Kwamé shares the songs with Hurby and Sylvia Robinson (of Sugar Hill Records Fame). Hurby is not responding face enough, and so Robinson offers him a recording contract based off the demo. At the same time, his dad slipped the demo to Sony and they had an interest. This is exciting and upon returning back to Hurby, he finds out that the reason Hurby did not respond as quickly is because he was shopping it to a gang of labels and they were interested. Warner Bros., Atlantic and Epic records were presented by his neighborhood friend. He had a bidding war for the young gent. He wound up signing with another Sylvia… The Sylvia in the business… Sylvia Rhone.

The second gem is why he did not use vulgar language. Mostly for Kwamé, he never wanted to disrespect his Islamic faith or say/do something that would embarrass people that he cared about. He talks about his struggle to be authentic to who he saw himself, and what the crew wanted him to be. Just think about the polka-dots. He was 16, and had a few choice pieces to rock. He inter-swapped three pieces that he had, but some how created a movement. He could not spend money that he did not have.

The biggest gem that he dropped was about two of the dopest rappers of all time. Hurby apparently beat into his head that lyrical rappers would never work in Hip-Hop. The producer had his eyes on the bigger pie in the music industry, and was very much into making a cross-over rap record.

“He would say ‘Kane will never go anywhere. Rakim will never go anywhere. The people I was loving and the people I wanted to be on par with, he was just like it is not going to work. There are a million lyrical tough guys out here. You got to be ‘this,’ the light hearted high school kid that likes to have fun and chase girl.’”

But Kwamé again struggled to challenge his mentor. He understood in his heart that the artists who lasted forever focused more on artistry than gimmicks.

“On one end of the spectrum, you have Hurby saying ‘We got to go pop, we got to go pop’” Kwamé reflects. Then he continues “And then on the other end of the spectrum, I don’t want to be forgotten.”

Kwamé also gave props to people like Slick Rick, LL Cool J, KRS1 and Big Daddy Kane for not only being some of the top rappers of his time, but also for their production skills.

The post Kwamé Says That Hurby “Luv Bug” Slept On Rakim and Big Daddy Kane appeared first on The Source.

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TOMORROW! “Allah , Justice & The Five Percenters Square” Street Sign Unveiling In Harlem

Much anticipation has been brewing since last May when the campaign to co-name the northwest corner of 126th Street & Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd. in Harlem as “Allah, Justice & The Five Percenters Square” began. This Saturday afternoon that vision finally comes to fruition when the unveiling ceremony is conducted at the very same location.

A number of prominent people are set to speak, which are primarily some founding members of the Five Percent Nation, including Rasul-Rafiq, Omala Earth, First Born ABG and others who were present from 1964 to 1969; the formative years of the Black cultural phenomenon known as Allah’s 5%. They’ll discuss Allah and Justice’s social influences regarding inner-city youth during that era.

Allah, who is the founder of the 5% Nation, and his “main man” Justice will have their physical family members present at the unveiling namely Kenya Smith, Clarence Smith Jr. & Elijah Howell, who is Old Man Justice’s son. They all will speak from the relatives’ perspective.

Urban music legends DJ Marley Marl, DJ Kool Herc, Popa Wu, Rakim Allah, Brand Nubian, dead prez, The Force MDs, TaharQa Aleem and several others are confirmed and will speak about the Five Percenters’ contributions to the Hip-Hop culture.

Also confirmed to attend are Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr., Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, Mayor Lindsay aide Sid Davidoff and others.

After the actual unveiling of the sign, a reception will be conducted at Allah School In Mecca, located at 2122 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd., where more official history about the Nation will be discussed by other original Gods & Earths, as well as some highly influential Hip-Hop artists.

A segment of the program is devoted to some of the younger Five Percenters, who will be heavily influenced as they mature into adulthood. Afterwards, some of the elder Gods & Earths will receive commemorative rewards for their decades-long contributions.

“Allah and Justice’s influence is undeniable, it has effected every segment of society,”

contends Mal’akiy 17 Allah, a.k.a. KOS 5 Allah, who’s spearheading this campaign. “Our impact has been so profound that it’s still being felt globally more than five decades later.”

Preparations are being made to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Allah The Father’s assassination, which will be recognized June 7th -9th @ the Allah School In Mecca during the Annual Science Fair And Educational Show & Prove.

– written by Ice Pick Slim 17

The post TOMORROW! “Allah , Justice & The Five Percenters Square” Street Sign Unveiling In Harlem appeared first on The Source.

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Large Professor Details Nas’ Early ’90s Demos & Who Has The Tapes (Video)

Nas typically keeps it strictly business when it comes to his social media usage so when he does take a moment to pause and get personal, it is notably with intention. On Thursday (March 21), the prolific MC took to Instagram to wish Large Professor and DJ Premier a happy birthday, thanking both Illmatic producers for playing integral mentorship roles early on in his career, respectively. The Queens, New York native then reflected on meeting Large Professor when he was only 17 years old, going on to big up the veteran producer for showing him how to “properly lay vocals” and help him structure songs, to name a few cherished lessons.

During a newly-released interview with VladTV, Large Professor returns the nostalgic sentiment, discussing how he first crossed paths with a then-aspiring MC through Joe Fatal. Their meeting was clearly destined, with all three collaborating on Main Source’s iconic track, “Live At The Barbeque.” The song, which also introduced Akinyele, appeared on the album Breaking Atoms, doubled as Nas’ first-ever appearance on wax.

Nas & Travis Scott Discuss The Power Of Hip-Hop & Why Its Messages Cannot Be Stopped

“Joe Fatal was like the street, the connect, you know what I’m saying. He’s Uptown, Downtown, all around, you know kind of thing,” Large reflected at the 2:00 mark. “Me and Joe Fatal are like childhood friends, like five years old type-sh*t in Flushing, so he moved away and then when he came back, he was this Long Island City, Queensbridge dude now. Like yo, man, I be out in Queensbridge, I got [Tragedy Khadafi], I’ma bring Trag’ through. It was like ‘Word you make beats? Aight, aight.’ He click-clacked everything with me and Nas.”

After touching on how Joe Fatal (who also raps on “Live At The Barbeque”) initially introduced him to Nas, the conversation shifted to the nature of their early collaborations and the material they worked on at the beginning of their now-decades long friendship.

Nas Sounds Truly Inspired On A Beautiful New Song With Amy Winehouse

“Fatal was like, we’re going to record a demo, so we went to Coney Island and they came and picked me up from school,” he shared. “I was bringing the drum machine to school type-sh*t. So it was like we’re going to meet up after and go… We had tons of demos.”

Vlad then asks if the 1991 Main Source collaboration was the first Nas-Large Professor link. “We had mad demos; we had tons of demos,” says “the Mad Scientist” at 3:30. “We had ‘550 Fahrenheit,’ ‘Top Choice Of The Female Persuasion,’ we had mad demos, during the Eric B. & Rakim time. It was a few of them. Shout out to my man G-Wiz, Ill Will, all of them—Jungle used to be there. He used to be sitting in the studio, early-ass in the morning. Definitely.” According to several accounts, Eric B. & Rakim blocked off studio sessions for Let The Rhythm Hit ‘Em, which Large Professor worked extensively on in an un-credited capacity. When Rakim or Eric did not show, the producer worked with Kool G Rap & DJ Polo, Akinyele, Nas, and others.

Mister Cee Explains Why Biggie’s Ready To Die Sounds Like 2 Different Albums

Vlad asks what happened to these tapes. “They are somewhere out there,” Extra P says, revealing an exciting gem about their very existence. “That’s the crazy thing about it. I think Nas has the tapes. I think once the bread was good, he was like, ‘Yo, I secured them tapes.’ I remember him telling me that one time. They are somewhere out in the world.” However, P also suggests that some of those early ’90s rhymes were recycled other places. “The thing with good artists, you’ve probably heard some of them rhymes, ’cause dudes be doin’ the mix-or-clicks on rhymes.” On subsequent editions of Illmatic, Nas—who co-owns Mass Appeal Records—has released songs such as “I’m A Villain,” along with alternate mixes of his 1994 cuts.

Next, the veteran producer/MC/DJ waxes poetic on how he realized from the jump that Nas was fated to do some incredible things for the culture at large, even years prior to dropping his seminal classic, 1994’s Illmatic.

Large Professor Confirms That Main Source Is Making New Music

“I always knew. I went through so many stages of Hip-Hop and life to be confident enough to know what it was. This is it,” he explained. “Ain’t no question about that. You go through enough to know, that’s that sh*t. Whenever I heard Nas, I’d be like, nah he’s ill. He’s going to be big.”

From referring to Nas’ lyrical prowess as “the beginning of shock rap,” in how it made a person react strongly and revisit what he spit in order to process the meaning, to explaining how he connected with the MC due to his humble nature, Large Professor is among those from Queens who experienced firsthand how “the Borough was peaking with pride” when the legendary rapper began solidifying his path in Hip-Hop.

Swizz Beatz Got Nas’ Best Verse Of 2018 & He Treats It Like Fine Art

Nas was humble. He’d always say some out of the ordinary sh*t, you know what I’m saying. I’ll always say that. He’d always say something out of the ordinary but then he’d say something cool and humble,” he noted. “‘I sip the Dom P, watchin’ Gandhi.’ There’s no knucklehead-ass kid out there in the street, you know, watching Gandhi. You know there’s a peaceful part of him; he’s got the patience to watch Gandhi but he’s getting twisted on some hood sh*t. It was things like that.”

Given their past work together, as well as their ability to still inspire one another all these years later, it goes without saying that these two are not only proud of what they’ve accomplished together, but extremely grateful for the opportunity to share such historic experiences together.

Nas Demands A Second Look At His Album With A Stunning Short Film (Video)

#BonusBeat: Part 1 of Vlad’s conversation with the Extra P:

 

Nas typically keeps it strictly business when it comes to his social media usage so when he does take a moment to pause and get personal, it is notably with intention. On Thursday (March 21), the prolific MC took to Instagram to wish Large Professor and DJ Premier a happy birthday, thanking both Illmatic producers for playing integral mentorship roles early on in his career, respectively. The Queens, New York native then reflected on meeting Large Professor when he was only 17 years old, going on to big up the veteran producer for showing him how to “properly lay vocals” and help him structure songs, to name a few cherished lessons.

During a newly-released interview with VladTV, Large Professor returns the nostalgic sentiment, discussing how he first crossed paths with a then-aspiring MC through Joe Fatal. Their meeting was clearly destined, with all three collaborating on Main Source’s iconic track, “Live At The Barbeque.” The song, which also introduced Akinyele, appeared on the album Breaking Atoms, doubled as Nas’ first-ever appearance on wax.

Nas & Travis Scott Discuss The Power Of Hip-Hop & Why Its Messages Cannot Be Stopped

“Joe Fatal was like the street, the connect, you know what I’m saying. He’s Uptown, Downtown, all around, you know kind of thing,” Large reflected at the 2:00 mark. “Me and Joe Fatal are like childhood friends, like five years old type-sh*t in Flushing, so he moved away and then when he came back, he was this Long Island City, Queensbridge dude now. Like yo, man, I be out in Queensbridge, I got [Tragedy Khadafi], I’ma bring Trag’ through. It was like ‘Word you make beats? Aight, aight.’ He click-clacked everything with me and Nas.”

After touching on how Joe Fatal (who also raps on “Live At The Barbeque”) initially introduced him to Nas, the conversation shifted to the nature of their early collaborations and the material they worked on at the beginning of their now-decades long friendship.

Nas Sounds Truly Inspired On A Beautiful New Song With Amy Winehouse

“Fatal was like, we’re going to record a demo, so we went to Coney Island and they came and picked me up from school,” he shared. “I was bringing the drum machine to school type-sh*t. So it was like we’re going to meet up after and go… We had tons of demos.”

Vlad then asks if the 1991 Main Source collaboration was the first Nas-Large Professor link. “We had mad demos; we had tons of demos,” says “the Mad Scientist” at 3:30. “We had ‘550 Fahrenheit,’ ‘Top Choice Of The Female Persuasion,’ we had mad demos, during the Eric B. & Rakim time. It was a few of them. Shout out to my man G-Wiz, Ill Will, all of them—Jungle used to be there. He used to be sitting in the studio, early-ass in the morning. Definitely.” According to several accounts, Eric B. & Rakim blocked off studio sessions for Let The Rhythm Hit ‘Em, which Large Professor worked extensively on in an un-credited capacity. When Rakim or Eric did not show, the producer worked with Kool G Rap & DJ Polo, Akinyele, Nas, and others.

Mister Cee Explains Why Biggie’s Ready To Die Sounds Like 2 Different Albums

Vlad asks what happened to these tapes. “They are somewhere out there,” Extra P says, revealing an exciting gem about their very existence. “That’s the crazy thing about it. I think Nas has the tapes. I think once the bread was good, he was like, ‘Yo, I secured them tapes.’ I remember him telling me that one time. They are somewhere out in the world.” However, P also suggests that some of those early ’90s rhymes were recycled other places. “The thing with good artists, you’ve probably heard some of them rhymes, ’cause dudes be doin’ the mix-or-clicks on rhymes.” On subsequent editions of Illmatic, Nas—who co-owns Mass Appeal Records—has released songs such as “I’m A Villain,” along with alternate mixes of his 1994 cuts.

Next, the veteran producer/MC/DJ waxes poetic on how he realized from the jump that Nas was fated to do some incredible things for the culture at large, even years prior to dropping his seminal classic, 1994’s Illmatic.

Large Professor Confirms That Main Source Is Making New Music

“I always knew. I went through so many stages of Hip-Hop and life to be confident enough to know what it was. This is it,” he explained. “Ain’t no question about that. You go through enough to know, that’s that sh*t. Whenever I heard Nas, I’d be like, nah he’s ill. He’s going to be big.”

From referring to Nas’ lyrical prowess as “the beginning of shock rap,” in how it made a person react strongly and revisit what he spit in order to process the meaning, to explaining how he connected with the MC due to his humble nature, Large Professor is among those from Queens who experienced firsthand how “the Borough was peaking with pride” when the legendary rapper began solidifying his path in Hip-Hop.

Swizz Beatz Got Nas’ Best Verse Of 2018 & He Treats It Like Fine Art

Nas was humble. He’d always say some out of the ordinary sh*t, you know what I’m saying. I’ll always say that. He’d always say something out of the ordinary but then he’d say something cool and humble,” he noted. “‘I sip the Dom P, watchin’ Gandhi.’ There’s no knucklehead-ass kid out there in the street, you know, watching Gandhi. You know there’s a peaceful part of him; he’s got the patience to watch Gandhi but he’s getting twisted on some hood sh*t. It was things like that.”

Given their past work together, as well as their ability to still inspire one another all these years later, it goes without saying that these two are not only proud of what they’ve accomplished together, but extremely grateful for the opportunity to share such historic experiences together.

Nas Demands A Second Look At His Album With A Stunning Short Film (Video)

#BonusBeat: Part 1 of Vlad’s conversation with the Extra P:

 

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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Andrew Yang Is The Rakim Of Politics (Video)

Rakim placed foresight and business-minded logic into the minds of Hip-Hop Heads the moment he rapped “Thinking of a master plan” on Paid in Full in 1987. More than thirty years later, a presidential candidate in the 2020 election is stepping forward with a vision that could legitimately solve America’s deepening economic crisis.

His name is Andrew Yang, a Democrat, Asian American, entrepreneur, author and founder of Venture for America. He had a role in President Barack Obama’s administration, serving as a “Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship.” Though his name is largely unknown, Yang actually launched his bid for the presidency in 2017 and is running on the slogan “Humanity First.” Since then, he’s campaigned on the concept of Universal Basic Income (UBI), the idea that the federal government should provide every single American adult with a tax free, no-questions-asked sum of money. The UBI would be a a partial salve for a lot of the diseases plaguing America’s economy: racial inequality, job loss to automation, class disparity, gender inequality and more.

Rakim Speaks About Why Artists & Athletes Should Fight For Justice (Audio)

Yang recently visited The Breakfast Club, where he delivered a 45-minute interview outlining the specifics of what sounds like, to many of us, a completely radical idea. But he breaks down complex ideas in a way that may change the way Americans think about the structure of government, much like The God MC’s approach to lyricism did to the art of Rap.

Yang studied economics in college, which is already enough to separate him greatly from the so-called entrepreneurial expertise of Donald Trump. “I’m running for president to help us evolve and advance to the next stage of our economy,” he says early in the interview. His background in economics makes him particularly interested in the effects of automation and the role machines play in overhauling the way our jobs market functions.

At the 2:30 mark, he says “Half of the people who lost their jobs to automation never worked again. Of that group, half filed for disability. Then, you saw a massive surge in alcohol use and drug overdoses. Suicides and depression. There’s a lot of despair, a lot of suffering. And it’s going unaddressed around the country and, unfortunately, it’s just going to ramp up…One of the things I’m trying to tell people is, ‘Look. This is no longer speculative.’ This has been ripping a hole in our communities and our society for years…It is not immigrants…immigrants have nothing to do with the economic distress. It’s the fact that technology is advancing to a point where our labor is less and less central to the economy.”

Millions Of Americans May Soon Lose Their Jobs…To Their Trucks (Video)

It’s near the 10:00 mark that Yang begins to focus on the UBI, which he has re-branded as the “Freedom Dividend.”

“I’m proposing we declare a dividend of $1,000 a month for every American adult, starting at age 18,” he says. “It would be a game-changer for tens of millions of American families, because we know 78% of Americans live paycheck to paycheck. Fifty-percent can’t afford an unexpected $500 bill. We have the money. We’re the richest, most advanced economy in the history of the world. We can easily afford a $1,000 a month dividend.”

Yang takes the opportunity to remind or inform listeners that this is not at all a radical idea. Martin Luther King, Jr. supported a similar plan in 1967. “He called it the Guaranteed Minimum Income,” says Yang before adding, “It’s a very American idea…it seems far out to us now, but we’ve been talking about this for decades. It came this close to being launched in 1971. It actually passed the House of Representatives twice under Richard Nixon.”

He brings up the state of Alaska, which for decades has been supplementing its residents’ income with a dividend from the oil industry, known as the Petroleum Dividend. Yang’s argument is we can do the same, with technology money. Corporations like Amazon and Netflix recently made headlines for paying zero taxes, despite record profits. “Who wins from artificial intelligence? Who wins from innovation?,” he asks near the 5:50 mark. “It’s gonna be Amazon. It’s gonna be Google, Uber, Facebook…the biggest tech companies that will have the AI [artificial intelligence] that will start displacing workers. The American people will not see much money from that, at all.”

Improving how the American tax system treats megacorporations and the ultra-wealthy is one of the central tenets to sourcing money for the Freedom Dividend. So is implementing a tax on goods and services. As Yang explains near the 18:00 mark, “We’ve realized that this economy has gotten entirely unbalanced, where you have the top one percent Hoover-ing up all the gains, like a winner-take-all economy. The question is, how do you balance that out? To me, a [ten percent] value-added tax [a consumption tax placed on a product] is an efficient way to do it. It’s what every other country’s [with an advanced economy] already done, because it will get us a slice of every Amazon transaction, every Facebook ad, every Google search, every robot truck mile and bring it to the American people. And then, what are we gonna do? We’re gonna spend that money in the economy. It’s gonna create two-plus million jobs. And Amazon and the gang are still gonna get that money back, but at least it comes through our hands. We are the owners and the shareholders of this country, and this is a dividend for us.”

2 Chainz Explains Why True Wealth Isn’t About Having The Most Expensivest Things (Video)

At the 23:35 mark, Yang illustrates just how serious he is about the implementation of his so-called Freedom Dividend. “I’m personally giving 1,000 bucks a month to a family in New Hampshire and a family in Iowa. And, shocker: they like it…it’s embarrassing that a lot of the money for these trials is coming from private individuals. ‘Cause in the ’60s and ’70s, the United States government was giving money to thousands of American families to test out whether this sort of program works.

It should be the public sector leading the charge on this, because we’re entering the age of AI. We’re going to have self-driving cars and trucks in five to ten years. Thirty percent of malls are going to close in the next four years thanks to Amazon. Two-and-a-half million call-center workers in the U.S. are going to get replaced by AI.”

When he’s asked by Charlamagne near the 21:03 mark whether Andrew Yang has a “Black Agenda,” Yang says his plans for the Freedom Dividend and the additional implementation of single-payer, universal healthcare will contribute to the improvement of the African-American sector. But he also adds some of his other campaign policies. “A lot of it overlaps with my overall agenda, because I think that the Freedom Dividend and universal healthcare go a long way. But I’m for getting rid of private prisons. It makes no sense to have prisons that have a profit motivation,” he says.

He also supports a drastic overhaul of how the federal government and state governments handle drug laws. As he explains, “I’m for the legalization of marijuana in part because of our administration of the criminal laws are deeply racist. It’s very obvious to everyone. So on April 20th, 2021, I’m going to pardon everyone who’s in prison for a low level, non-violent drug offense. It makes no sense to have people in jail for stuff that’s legal in some parts of the country,” he says before moving on to how his approach to legalization of marijuana and its sales economy could benefit communities of color. “I know there are bills that want to channel that money to African-American businesses and communities, which is a great idea.” (20:12)

JAY-Z & Meek Mill Have Joined Forces To Free Those Unjustly Held In Prison

Yang shifts his response towards education shortly thereafter. “I’m for dramatically increasing the federal allotment to HBCUs [Historically Black Colleges and Universities]. The problem with education right now is that it’s become a business. What happens is, schools end up benefiting by catering to the affluent. So, you have these HBCUs that have an incredible historical mission that’s shown to elevate hundreds of thousands of African Americans. But, because they don’t have these crazy endowments that some of the rich schools do, they’re struggling.”

Yang continues to focus on the African-American sector later in the interview, returning to the topic at the 26:39 mark. “There was a report in the Guardian that said the median African-American household net worth is going to be zero by 2053. Like, in 34 years. Why are they forecasting that? It’s because of this economic tidal wave that is coming. This economic tidal wave’s gonna wipe out many working-class jobs. It’s going to be the equivalent of a natural disaster. We know what happens in a natural disaster. Who suffers? Poor people. People of color. And the same thing’s gonna happen in this. That’s why I’m running for president. I can see the tidal wave coming very, very clearly.”

Women would also benefit directly from the Freedom Dividend, Yang argues at the 30:20 mark. “Right now, there are millions of American women in exploiting or abusive jobs and relationships because they lack the economic freedom to actually make a change in their situation. So, the democratic party is going to talk about the empowerment of women. You know what’s going to empower women? A thousand bucks a month.”

Earlier in the interview, Yang offers up a summation of his campaign platform, saying near the 28:40 mark, “Trump is a symptom. What is the disease? The disease is the fact that we’re getting pushed into economic distress. The disease is the mindset of scarcity that has overtaken our people, because if you can’t pay your bills, then it’s very, very hard to be clear-thinking and optimistic of the future. The disease is, increasingly, that we’re going to be competing against machines that are going to be able to outdo us when it comes to the capital efficiency.

So how do you cure the actual disease? Most politicians do not want to touch this with a ten-foot pole, because they don’t have real solutions. The solution I’m going to suggest is that we share the bounty from all this economic progress as fast as possible. And that’s why I’m running for president.”

Dave Chappelle & Jon Stewart Talk Politics Unusual (Video)

Elsewhere in the interview, Yang discusses entrepreneurs as president (7:00), student-loan debt (11:40), universal healthcare (14:17), getting rid of tax incentives for companies who move away (19:00), raising the presidential income to $4 million (24:09), role of welfare and government assistance in Universal Basic Income (27:22), getting Trump supporters to vote for him (30:07), trucking jobs (34:00), building an economy based on human value (36:00), gun laws (37:45), making tax day a holiday and choosing where to send tax money (40:00) and much more.

To learn more about Andrew Yang’s policy proposals, click here to visit the official website for his presidential campaign.

Rakim placed foresight and business-minded logic into the minds of Hip-Hop Heads the moment he rapped “Thinking of a master plan” on Paid in Full in 1987. More than thirty years later, a presidential candidate in the 2020 election is stepping forward with a vision that could legitimately solve America’s deepening economic crisis.

His name is Andrew Yang, a Democrat, Asian American, entrepreneur, author and founder of Venture for America. He had a role in President Barack Obama’s administration, serving as a “Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship.” Though his name is largely unknown, Yang actually launched his bid for the presidency in 2017 and is running on the slogan “Humanity First.” Since then, he’s campaigned on the concept of Universal Basic Income (UBI), the idea that the federal government should provide every single American adult with a tax free, no-questions-asked sum of money. The UBI would be a a partial salve for a lot of the diseases plaguing America’s economy: racial inequality, job loss to automation, class disparity, gender inequality and more.

Rakim Speaks About Why Artists & Athletes Should Fight For Justice (Audio)

Yang recently visited The Breakfast Club, where he delivered a 45-minute interview outlining the specifics of what sounds like, to many of us, a completely radical idea. But he breaks down complex ideas in a way that may change the way Americans think about the structure of government, much like The God MC’s approach to lyricism did to the art of Rap.

Yang studied economics in college, which is already enough to separate him greatly from the so-called entrepreneurial expertise of Donald Trump. “I’m running for president to help us evolve and advance to the next stage of our economy,” he says early in the interview. His background in economics makes him particularly interested in the effects of automation and the role machines play in overhauling the way our jobs market functions.

At the 2:30 mark, he says “Half of the people who lost their jobs to automation never worked again. Of that group, half filed for disability. Then, you saw a massive surge in alcohol use and drug overdoses. Suicides and depression. There’s a lot of despair, a lot of suffering. And it’s going unaddressed around the country and, unfortunately, it’s just going to ramp up…One of the things I’m trying to tell people is, ‘Look. This is no longer speculative.’ This has been ripping a hole in our communities and our society for years…It is not immigrants…immigrants have nothing to do with the economic distress. It’s the fact that technology is advancing to a point where our labor is less and less central to the economy.”

Millions Of Americans May Soon Lose Their Jobs…To Their Trucks (Video)

It’s near the 10:00 mark that Yang begins to focus on the UBI, which he has re-branded as the “Freedom Dividend.”

“I’m proposing we declare a dividend of $1,000 a month for every American adult, starting at age 18,” he says. “It would be a game-changer for tens of millions of American families, because we know 78% of Americans live paycheck to paycheck. Fifty-percent can’t afford an unexpected $500 bill. We have the money. We’re the richest, most advanced economy in the history of the world. We can easily afford a $1,000 a month dividend.”

Yang takes the opportunity to remind or inform listeners that this is not at all a radical idea. Martin Luther King, Jr. supported a similar plan in 1967. “He called it the Guaranteed Minimum Income,” says Yang before adding, “It’s a very American idea…it seems far out to us now, but we’ve been talking about this for decades. It came this close to being launched in 1971. It actually passed the House of Representatives twice under Richard Nixon.”

He brings up the state of Alaska, which for decades has been supplementing its residents’ income with a dividend from the oil industry, known as the Petroleum Dividend. Yang’s argument is we can do the same, with technology money. Corporations like Amazon and Netflix recently made headlines for paying zero taxes, despite record profits. “Who wins from artificial intelligence? Who wins from innovation?,” he asks near the 5:50 mark. “It’s gonna be Amazon. It’s gonna be Google, Uber, Facebook…the biggest tech companies that will have the AI [artificial intelligence] that will start displacing workers. The American people will not see much money from that, at all.”

Improving how the American tax system treats megacorporations and the ultra-wealthy is one of the central tenets to sourcing money for the Freedom Dividend. So is implementing a tax on goods and services. As Yang explains near the 18:00 mark, “We’ve realized that this economy has gotten entirely unbalanced, where you have the top one percent Hoover-ing up all the gains, like a winner-take-all economy. The question is, how do you balance that out? To me, a [ten percent] value-added tax [a consumption tax placed on a product] is an efficient way to do it. It’s what every other country’s [with an advanced economy] already done, because it will get us a slice of every Amazon transaction, every Facebook ad, every Google search, every robot truck mile and bring it to the American people. And then, what are we gonna do? We’re gonna spend that money in the economy. It’s gonna create two-plus million jobs. And Amazon and the gang are still gonna get that money back, but at least it comes through our hands. We are the owners and the shareholders of this country, and this is a dividend for us.”

2 Chainz Explains Why True Wealth Isn’t About Having The Most Expensivest Things (Video)

At the 23:35 mark, Yang illustrates just how serious he is about the implementation of his so-called Freedom Dividend. “I’m personally giving 1,000 bucks a month to a family in New Hampshire and a family in Iowa. And, shocker: they like it…it’s embarrassing that a lot of the money for these trials is coming from private individuals. ‘Cause in the ’60s and ’70s, the United States government was giving money to thousands of American families to test out whether this sort of program works.

It should be the public sector leading the charge on this, because we’re entering the age of AI. We’re going to have self-driving cars and trucks in five to ten years. Thirty percent of malls are going to close in the next four years thanks to Amazon. Two-and-a-half million call-center workers in the U.S. are going to get replaced by AI.”

When he’s asked by Charlamagne near the 21:03 mark whether Andrew Yang has a “Black Agenda,” Yang says his plans for the Freedom Dividend and the additional implementation of single-payer, universal healthcare will contribute to the improvement of the African-American sector. But he also adds some of his other campaign policies. “A lot of it overlaps with my overall agenda, because I think that the Freedom Dividend and universal healthcare go a long way. But I’m for getting rid of private prisons. It makes no sense to have prisons that have a profit motivation,” he says.

He also supports a drastic overhaul of how the federal government and state governments handle drug laws. As he explains, “I’m for the legalization of marijuana in part because of our administration of the criminal laws are deeply racist. It’s very obvious to everyone. So on April 20th, 2021, I’m going to pardon everyone who’s in prison for a low level, non-violent drug offense. It makes no sense to have people in jail for stuff that’s legal in some parts of the country,” he says before moving on to how his approach to legalization of marijuana and its sales economy could benefit communities of color. “I know there are bills that want to channel that money to African-American businesses and communities, which is a great idea.” (20:12)

JAY-Z & Meek Mill Have Joined Forces To Free Those Unjustly Held In Prison

Yang shifts his response towards education shortly thereafter. “I’m for dramatically increasing the federal allotment to HBCUs [Historically Black Colleges and Universities]. The problem with education right now is that it’s become a business. What happens is, schools end up benefiting by catering to the affluent. So, you have these HBCUs that have an incredible historical mission that’s shown to elevate hundreds of thousands of African Americans. But, because they don’t have these crazy endowments that some of the rich schools do, they’re struggling.”

Yang continues to focus on the African-American sector later in the interview, returning to the topic at the 26:39 mark. “There was a report in the Guardian that said the median African-American household net worth is going to be zero by 2053. Like, in 34 years. Why are they forecasting that? It’s because of this economic tidal wave that is coming. This economic tidal wave’s gonna wipe out many working-class jobs. It’s going to be the equivalent of a natural disaster. We know what happens in a natural disaster. Who suffers? Poor people. People of color. And the same thing’s gonna happen in this. That’s why I’m running for president. I can see the tidal wave coming very, very clearly.”

Women would also benefit directly from the Freedom Dividend, Yang argues at the 30:20 mark. “Right now, there are millions of American women in exploiting or abusive jobs and relationships because they lack the economic freedom to actually make a change in their situation. So, the democratic party is going to talk about the empowerment of women. You know what’s going to empower women? A thousand bucks a month.”

Earlier in the interview, Yang offers up a summation of his campaign platform, saying near the 28:40 mark, “Trump is a symptom. What is the disease? The disease is the fact that we’re getting pushed into economic distress. The disease is the mindset of scarcity that has overtaken our people, because if you can’t pay your bills, then it’s very, very hard to be clear-thinking and optimistic of the future. The disease is, increasingly, that we’re going to be competing against machines that are going to be able to outdo us when it comes to the capital efficiency.

So how do you cure the actual disease? Most politicians do not want to touch this with a ten-foot pole, because they don’t have real solutions. The solution I’m going to suggest is that we share the bounty from all this economic progress as fast as possible. And that’s why I’m running for president.”

Dave Chappelle & Jon Stewart Talk Politics Unusual (Video)

Elsewhere in the interview, Yang discusses entrepreneurs as president (7:00), student-loan debt (11:40), universal healthcare (14:17), getting rid of tax incentives for companies who move away (19:00), raising the presidential income to $4 million (24:09), role of welfare and government assistance in Universal Basic Income (27:22), getting Trump supporters to vote for him (30:07), trucking jobs (34:00), building an economy based on human value (36:00), gun laws (37:45), making tax day a holiday and choosing where to send tax money (40:00) and much more.

To learn more about Andrew Yang’s policy proposals, click here to visit the official website for his presidential campaign.

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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Nas & Rakim Share Priceless Hip-Hop Moment: “Top 2 To Ever Rap!!!!”

Nas

New York rapper Nas rubbed elbows with greatness this week. God’s Son has blessed social media with a sneak peek at himself linked up with rap pioneer Rakim.

Nasir Jones jumped on Instagram Thursday with a must-like shot of himself, his brother Jungle and the music icon.

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Jabari Rakim Nasir. #Build

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Earlier this year, Nas linked up for a priceless hip-hop moment alongside music icons JAY-Z and Diddy.

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US! #TheBlackPack

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Very epic! #Nas #JAYZ #Diddy #SOHH Swipe 👉🏽

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In November, Nas released a highly-anticipated self-titled short film.

Last July, Nas low-key revealed he has a new album on deck.

“It’s another album that I already had been working on before [the one with] Kanye,” he told Martinez. “Since I did this, I gotta do something that goes into another direction a little bit. I’m finishing up the next one.” Nas confirms he’s done work with Swizz Beatz and RZA (“I’m a big Wu-Tang fan”). He also acknowledged the six-year gap between 2012’s Life Is Good and this summer’s Nasir, promising the wait for his next album won’t be as long. “All the time that went by, it’s dope because now I get to do it from another level,” he said. “I get to make music from an older point of view.” (Billboard)

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Nas Celebrates A True Rap Icon’s Birthday

Nas

New York rapper Nas knows how to respect his elders. The hip-hop veteran has saluted the birthday of rap G.O.A.T. contender Rakim.

Nasir Jones hopped on Instagram Tuesday (January 29) to show the Big Apple legend a major salute.

Last year, New York rapper 50 Cent reflected on seeing an epic Eric B. and Rakim reunion show.

The same week, Nas talked about seeing the rap pioneers for their live set.

Back in fall 2016, Nas hilariously tipped his hat to Eric B. ahead of the presidential election.

screen-shot-2016-10-14-at-5-23-01-pm

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