Tag Archives: Q&A Interviews

Q&A With New Mexico’s Underground Hip Hop Staple Def-i

Yo Def-i We really appreciate you rocking with UGHHBLOG for well over 2+ years now! You’re definitely a true stand out artist out of New Mexico for 2021. Please tell us how many years you’ve been making music? For those unfamiliar, please shed some light on your background in the Hip Hop game. Please detail.

I appreciate your platform and been folllowing for some time now. I’ve been producing music for about 10 years and toured quite frequently throughout the decade. I got started in the game alongside my best bro Wake Self aka Andrew Martinez at a young age. We both joined an Indigenous Hip-Hop crew known as Foundations of Freedom and emerged from the indy rap and battle rap circuit. As a New Mexican, I was fortunate enough to be able to grow up around many B-Boys, B-Girls, Dancers, Writers, and DJs. I helped co-host NM’s longest running Hip-Hop weekly known as ‘Vinyl & Verses’ for years & began touring early on.

We noticed you rep your Native American roots heavy. Please shine some light on that, along with incorporating Hip Hop to spread awareness to the history behind it.

I am proud to be Indigenous and a tribal member of the Diné Nation (Navajo) & also part Mexican, too. As an adolescent youth, I fell in love with the culture of Hip-Hop and discovered similarities between it and my own traditional culture. Since I wasn’t raised in a strictly traditional way of life, Hip-Hop also helped me feel reconnected to my roots through music and provided a way to be a voice for our people who are very underrepresented.

Your career has had a strong second wind over the past few years. Do you find most of your fanbase familiar with you from your old projects, or do you feel that you’ve been discovered in recent years more so on the merit of your music. Please detail.

I feel there’s been a recent surge of new supporters partially due to the amount of new work that I’ve put out with various producers and artists. I think the quality of my music has evolved and improved over each project that has been released. I’m honored to have been featured on larger platforms such as UGHHBLOG and had the opportunity to tour with legendary Hip-Hop artists throughout the years. This also I have to credit for being able to reach larger audiences who appreciate lyrics.

When compared to other artists that you’ve collaborated with, what is it about Def-i that stands out and makes you unique from the pack. Please detail.

I feel Def-i stands out lyrically and is compatible to many styles of Hip-Hop & rap. I strive to write & perform verses/songs that I can really take pride in whether it’s for others or for my own projects.

Wow, your latest album “Drzltn” is a true BANGER is our books, your delivery & style is truly out of this world!  Tell us the story behind your recent project, And a little about the album cover concept!

My new album DRZLTN is also one of my favorites. Smoke M2D6 of Oldominion did most of the beats & One Be Lo of Binary Star also produced one of the songs. The album features Myka 9, Illmaculate, and Sleep of Oldominion to name a few and was mixed/mastered by Ariano. The album & cover was inspired by what people who grew up on the reservation refer to as “rez life” and the classic movie ‘Tron: Legacy’. In the movie, the word “derezzed” is used and it basically means ‘deresolution’ or when a program is shutdown from their grid system. I juxtaposed the ideas of our people who live “off-grid” on a rez with the futuristic non-fictional based concept of living on grid. I just wanted to convey the theme of being deprogrammed and essentially being able to leave the rez itself henceforth the cover art showing an indigenized grid system and Def-i walking out of a futuristic metropolis w/ Shiprock, NM in the background. I asked my crewmate Randy L. Barton to design the cover from these ideas and I really think he delivered what I wanted in the cover artwork.

What’s your favorite track off your latest album, and why? And please reference your favorite bar from this song that highlights your elite level lyricism.

One of my favorites from my latest album is ‘Napcatcher feat. A. Billi Free & Liv The Artist & I enjoy these bars, “Stare into a wishing well ’til you’re appearing in it/ Who’s the fairest of them all… mirror image/”

For this new year 2021, what do we have to look forward to when it comes to new Def-i music?  Please reference your forthcoming projects that you’re at liberty to speak of.

For 2021, I am proud to announce that my band’s album ‘Born In An Odd Time’ is being produced by 2x Grammy Winner John Lindemann. I’m part of a fusion based quartet known as D’DAT & we have a lot of upcoming projects such as a musical titled ‘Nataanii’ based around on the concept album itself. For my solo endeavors, I have another album ready to release & the project is produced entirely by Smoke M2D6 of Oldominion featuring a plethora of artists. I’m also working with Ariano on a few other upcoming projects, too.

Due to the pandemic, how are you pivoting with making music around this whole Covid 19 situation?

The COVID-19 pandemic really halted my regular tour schedule, but alternatively opened up more time to work on music from home. I recently hosted a virtual album release party for DRZLTN & participated in several online engagements that helped me sustain as an artist.

We have to ask, with all this social discourse and revolt, protesting and rioting, exposed police brutality toward blacks and BLM, how do you guys feel about this? We would love your perspective on the climate we are living in right now?

I feel we as a whole stand in solidarity with the BLM Movement and share goals such as wanting equality, police reform, land back, and much more. We share experiences of being subjugated to oppression, racism, colonial capitalism and other atrocities that were set forth by the U.S. government in the past. I feel that so many of us have been viewed as inferior or criminal by nature. Even our tribe (Diné) is popularly known as “Navajo” which translates to “thieves” which we are not, but this is how we were popularly referred to back then by oppressors & now people today. I love Hip-Hop so much because the culture brings us all together in a way & unites us all through modern ceremonial practices (cyphers, jams, music, dance, painting, song, etc.).

Our most popular question!!  What is your definition of “underground Hip Hop”?

I feel underground Hip-Hop is where the essence of the culture lives and still thrives today. You can find true practitioners of the culture living underground whether it be MCs, Style Writers, DJs, Dancers, and more. I tend to think of the underground Hip-Hop scene as a solid foundation. As a student of the culture, the underground aesthetic of Hip-Hop is raw and pure. The sound of underground Hip-Hop reminds me of how it could have felt to be in NYC before commercial entities were introduced to the culture itself. I gotta give credit to the Hip-Hop pioneers for paving the way.

Where can people find you on the web? Drop all the vital links.

Here are my social media links:
https://linktr.ee/def_i
https://instagram.com/def_i
https://youtube.com/c/DefiRaps
https://facebook.com/defrapper
https://www.paypal.me/defrapper
https://ddatlive.com
https://def-i.com
$defrapper

The post Q&A With New Mexico’s Underground Hip Hop Staple Def-i first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.
Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Q&A With Detroit’s Very Own TNV

Hey TNV! Please tell us how many years you’ve been making music?

I’ve been making music over 25 years. I started off writing lyrics when I was 13 yrs old. From there I started to dabble in beat production and I was heavily influenced by underground Hip Hop, till this day it is the foundation of everything I make.

Tell us about your first ever debut track you put out? When was this?

Wow that’s was back in 2000. I was part of this rap group called the Driftas, the song was named Drifting. It was me and one other MC and a DJ. We collaborated and made a EP before it was even popular.

What separates you from many other MC’s in your city?

In Detroit there are some great MC’s. The underground scene has influenced me quite a bit. I would think my style of expression is distinct with my thought process and how I relay the message on pen and paper. I respect a lot of MC’s in Detroit, without there influences I wouldn’t have my own style.

How are you coping with this whole Covid 19 situation?

I believe GOD has a plan for my life. I’m married with three beautiful kids. I’m a introvert so it didn’t effect me drastically, but it is hard not seeing some of my family. In this season I’m learning to enjoy the little things like Health, family, finances and music opportunities. This year I definitely learned how to zone in on what GOD wants for my life.

Tell us about your biggest Hip Hop influences?

So I have influences on the Production and Lyricism part of Hip Hop because I do Both. I’m originally come from LA so Battlecat was one of the illest producers in the 80’s and 90’s. Dj Quik, Dj Alladin and Dr. Dre with that Cali sound. My Midwest and East Coast influences are JDilla, Marley Marl, Pete Rock, The Beatnuts, Dj Premier and The Bomb Squad. Lyricist I would say Rakim for me was a game changer. Krs One, Nas, King T, Black Moon, and Ice Cube has a special place in my heart when it comes to Lyricism.

Please breakdown the creative process of your latest album “Shine”. And tell us a little about the album cover concept!

Well 2020 could definitely be looked at as a difficult year. So I wanted “Shine” to be a reflection of a positive reflection on life. My production side is definitely influenced by Boom Bap, so it definitely needed to sound foundational in that gritty sound. Every sample for most of the songs told the Story for the track. “Shine” had more features than any other project I created, so every beat with a feature I thought about the style of the featured artist.

Your honest opinion, out of all the songs on the project, which is the one song you feel stands out the most!?

It’s a strong tie between “Shine” and “Part of the Band”. Shine featured Skyzoo, he is one of my favorite MC’s, he set the tone for the entire Album. Part of the Band featured Jaooo, this is another track that just hit hard with the concept and the flow from me and Jaooo.

We have to ask, with all this social discourse and revolt, protesting and rioting, exposed police brutality toward blacks and BLM, how do you guys feel about this? We would love your perspective on the climate we are living in right now?

We are living in the time of reciprocity. The history of this Country has revealed the true foundation of this Country. The only difference is with all the Social constructs with Social Media and technology it is being revealed in real time, what’s going on is nothing new. It is now the time for this country to repent for the systematic destruction of native Americans, Latinos and Blacks or we will see the falling of a Nation Like Rome.Racial reconciliation is needed for this country to become great, which it has never been on those lines.

Did you vote last year?

Yes I voted

If it came down to 1 ALBUM only, what underground Hip Hop album would you guys consider THE BEST OF ALL TIME!!!???……One 1 album you can choose.

I would have to say Mos Def”Black on both sides”

What is your definition of “underground Hip Hop”.

I would say it’s definitely a feeling. Underground definitely doesn’t play by the rules when it comes to the music industry influences. To create something that isn’t popish in sound and feeling. You definitely have to have a style of your own, perfection of lyricism and staying away from trends.

Drop all your link.

All digital outlets
https://linktr.ee/TNV
Website:
https://www.tnvmedia.com

The post Q&A With Detroit’s Very Own TNV first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.
Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Broken Cuffz: The Art of Networking with Dough Networkz

Doughboy a.k.a. Dough Networkz has mastered the art of networking in Hip Hop’s underground over the past few years. You may have seen his brand “Dough Networkz Presents” on various projects, especially over the last year. Releasing 10 projects with some of the Underground’s premiere beat-makers and spitters, Dough has become a staple in assembling high quality rap projects and bringing artists together. We at UGHHBLOG chopped it up with the Inglewood, CA native to take a deeper dive into his story and his plans for the future.

Peace brother, to start things off can you tell us where you’re from and how your surroundings influenced you to pursue a career in Hip Hop?

I’m from Inglewood, California born and raised most of my life…my environment wasn’t really an influence on me choosing a career in Hip-Hop, but a few people in it did. Like my best friend to this day Poly Rob who moved from New York to right across the street from me. We had to be 13 or 14 at the time but we connected fast on our mutual love for Hip-Hop, him turning me onto Eastcoast rap and me turning him onto Westcoast and down South rap…that was my influence and my schooling on the culture at the same time.

Who were your early influences growing up in Inglewood?

My earliest influences in Hip-Hop would have to be N.W.A. being that “Boys In The Hood” is the first rap song I can remember, but the biggest influence would have to come from the Death Row era in 92 or 93. I was a big fan of Warren G back then.  While everything around that time was more hard and aggressive, he always keep it smooth G FUNK is what his brand of music was called and it always caught my ear because it matched my mood just real chill and laid back.

How did you get introduced to the business side of the rap game?

The way I was introduced to the business-side of the rap game was through Poly Rob, early in our years we were big Hip-Hop heads and a vision of starting our own label. He started one in 2000 called Polidony ENT where I was named A&R. I didn’t have any idea what that was, so he gave me a book to read and that set me on my path.

Dope! So once you got your feet wet with Polidony as an A&R, did you branch out on your own at all?

Yes, during my time at Polidony I met  another artist by the name of Bae Delanoe through our mutual friend Rara. Bae was cold on the mic and I already had a vision to start my own label, so I decided to join up with him to form Bomb First ENT.  He was the featured artist and I was the CEO/A&R. We were in the beginning stages of building the label when I caught a case and was sentenced to 15 years in state prison. When I was first locked away I kind of lost my passion for the business but never the culture.  I would stay up to date on what was going on in music any way I could, XXL Magazine was my friend lol.

After you got locked up, how did you find your way back into rap music?

I lost contact with a lot of people early in my bid, but through the emergence of cell phones in prison I was able to reconnect.  I caught up with a few of my loved ones who told me that Bomb First ENT was still being pushed. Hearing that kind of re-lit the fire so to say… I decided to do whatever I could to still realize my vision of building my own label. I begin to work on my first compilation project called “Doughboy Music.” After I completed that I was then transferred to another prison where I ran into Tray Deee of the group Tha Eastsidaz. We formed a relationship through our faith in Islam. I used to bounce some of my ideas and things that I was doing with music off him and he would give me his honest feedback plus put me up on things that I didn’t know about the business. I was already on my mission before I met him, but I have to say his talks and critiques were instrumental in confirming that I was on the right path.

Wow, so now that you had Tray Deee giving you advice and direction, how were you able to reach out from inside the pen to build with other artists?

Before I went to prison there was no such thing as Facebook, Instagram etc. so I had to learn how to use these platforms while locked away. I first started with Myspace then I learned about Twitter.  I used it as my way to connect with the world and started to meet artists, journalists etc.. I met this kid from West Virginia named Josh and he had group by the name of Y.N.C. We got cool and I ended up managing them from my jail cell lol.  I was able to secure them a feature from Tray Deee and also a mixtape hosted by DJ Lt who was DJing for Snoop Dogg at the time. I was also able to form other relationships through social media, like with my guy Frank who introduced me to Elway and McKinley Ave who lead me to meeting some guys who ran a label in Atlanta called The Inkk Well.  Their names were Saddam and Mass Pike Miles. They understood my vision and struggle and took me under their wing, helping me with whatever I needed. 

After making these connections while inside, how did this art of networking transfer to life on the outside after getting released?

My last year before being released I came up with an idea for a project called “Broken Cuffz,” which would be a compilation project.  I began reaching out to every artist I knew.  I was able to secure features from Tray DeeeEastwood, Mass Pike Miles, Elway and others.  Poly Rob mixed and mastered the whole joint and it was ready for release upon my release from prison. I was sent to a halfway house in March 2017 after 13 years served.  I put together a release party for the album and couldn’t even attend it lol. I was there on Facetime though. Seeing the turnout and response to the album was a pinnacle moment for my confidence and gave me the drive to do another project  when I was fully free in the world,  so I created  “Broken Cuffz 2.” That project has a million plus streams to date.

You had some heavy-hitting MCs  on that “Broken Cuffz 2” project, how were you able to connect with artists like ConwayLarry June and Jay Worthy, among others?

I met Jay Worthy around the end of 2017 at a studio session I attended for our mutual friends TF and Ise Diddy. We chopped it up for hours about his music and other artists that we listened too. I told him my vision for building “Broken Cuffz 2” and he was rocking with the idea so much that he would invite me out to network and get some of the artist that was on my wish list and some others I’d meet along the way. He was instrumental to the success of that project by him just opening doors and letting me do my thing. I met Westside Gunn through Jay Worthy while at a studio session. It turned out me and Gunn had a mutual friend in Saddam. I Facetimed him and he told Gunn to rock with me and ever since Gunn has embraced me like family. Gunn brought me out to Coachella. I went around to some great events that he invited me to that opened so many doors for me as well.  That’s how I was able to meet my brother Flee Lord who I am working closely with now.

Sounds like Jay Worthy really was instrumental in your progression as an A&R and Exec producer, not to mention the fact that you earned respect from guys like Westside Gunn. Any other notable artists that you built with off this strength?

Yeah, I met Freddie Gibbs back in 2018 at a studio session. We chopped it up for hours about music and life and formed a good relationship through our faith as well since he’s Muslim also. I was able to secure a budget to put on a show and he headlined it. One of the best Hip-Hop shows that year.  It sold out and it seemed like the whole city was there.

Back to “Broken Cuffz 2” for a moment, you had mentioned the project had surpassed a million streams, besides the dope lineup of MCs, what helped the album garner that much attention?

Going back to “Broken Cuffz 2,”  that project is my baby. It took off the way it did because of the lead single by my guy Larry June and another artist named Dreebo called “Organic Pimping.”  That song was getting played in DJ sets all over the world and made it to the Cali fire playlist on Spotify all with no visuals. That song still gets played regularly until this day.

What is your goal with Dough Networkz Presents and what was your approach the past 2 years with putting together and releasing projects?

The goal with my brand DOUGH NETWORKZ PRESENTS is to build a platform for up and coming artists to get top-notch production and to help them generate a fan base off working with me. I’m for the underground and the ones trying to get it out the mud. My whole approach to dropping so many projects this year was to have my name in as many places as possible. I just wanted to flood the market so they would have no choice but to see the work i was putting together.

What are some of your favorite projects you’ve been a part of?

To date since I been home I have released over 12 projects with various artists, but my 3 favorite are: “Keep Going” by G4 Jag and Dirty Diggs, “Above Cloud Vision,” which is another project that I came up with in prison, also produced by Dirty Diggs, and being able to work with EDI Mean from The Outlawz on his project “OG VOLUME 2: CLASSICS IN SESSION,” which was a major accomplishment for me personally. Being a fan of 2Pac and The Outlawz, it was kind of surreal for me and a real honor.

 

You run Lord Mobb west for Flee Lord, how did you build your relationship with Flee and build a roster of artists for the Mobb who represent the Westcoast?

I met Flee through Westside Gunn and we formed a solid relationship when we kicked it in Buffalo. We became brothers over the last few years which led to him asking me to be a part of his new label Lord Mobb and to head the Westcoast part of it. Right now Lord Mobb West boasts two artists, TF and Phonk P. I met TF during my time in prison and Phonk P and I formed a bond during my recording of “Broken Cuffz 2.” We did a project called called “Phonky Ol Man” that was produced by Old Man 80s who’s a producer from Toronto. The project stands at 1 million streams to date.

How did you link up with The Outlawz and what plans do you have with them for the future?

I met EDI first and met Noble second through my work on EDI’s project and the good response gave me the confidence to ask them if I could help craft the “ONE NATION” album,  which is an album that Pac was working on when he passed…. and they agreed so we are building that as we speak. Got some great features on there already with a few big surprises for the fans, it’s coming out this year.

 

What other projects and business ventures do you have planned for 2021?

2021 is going to be big year.  From the “ONE NATION”  project to my work with Lord Mobb, albums coming from Left Lane DidonOsbe Chill, Dirty Diggs, Phonk P and lunching my merch line of hoodies tees etc… also building on my business outside of music with CBD and a new marijuana dispensary in the near future.

(You can cop some Dough Networkz merch here)

Lastly, we at UGHHBLOG always like to ask: what is your definition of  “Underground Hip-Hop?”

The definition of underground Hip-Hop to me is freedom, no boundaries. To me it’s the most honest lane in Hip-Hop. I love the underground!!

The post Broken Cuffz: The Art of Networking with Dough Networkz first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.
Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Q&A With Los Angeles Rapper JMisJustMe

Hey JMisJustMe! Please tell us how many years you’ve been making music.

I’ve been making music for 14 years.

Tell us about your first ever debut track you put out? When was this?

The first song that I pushed was called “The Wake Up!” I pressed it up on “CD” and sold them out the truck from LA to the IE.

What separates you from many other MC’s in your city?

I focus on self love and motivating others through my music. I’m not interested in separating myself from others. I’m more interested in growing in my craft to become the best artist I can be.

How are you coping with this whole Covid 19 situation?

I have been blessed to not have any of my family members seriously affected by the virus. The quarantine helped me focus on learning, growing and inspired me to create something people could vibe too.

Tell us about your biggest Hip Hop influences?

This is one of the hardest questions for me. I admire so many artists and their messages but if I had to choose it would be a tie between Tupac, Nipsey Hussle, Kanye West, Kendrick Lamar, and Andre3000.

Please breakdown the creative process of your latest album “JustMe Being Me”. And tell us a little about the album cover concept!

I believe allowing the music to be created organically. I wrote and produced over 100 songs until I developed a style and sound that I felt properly reproduced how I feel. Now as for the album art, it’s an image of a man manifesting his future into reality. The idea is that you can make anything that you want come to reality but it all starts in your mind.

Your honest opinion, out of all the songs on the project, which is the one song you feel stands out the most!?

I love all the songs but “You The One” has a special vibe to it. It’s one of a kind no cap. Probably the song I had the most fun creating.

We have to ask, with all this social discourse and revolt, protesting and rioting, exposed police brutality toward blacks and BLM, how do you guys feel about this? We would love your perspective on the climate we are living in right now?

After all we have been through this year, I feel that for real change to happen, it’s gonna take all of us working together. We have a long way to go to get there, but I feel like we are starting to head in the right direction.

Did you vote in 2020?

Yes

If it came down to 1 ALBUM only, what underground Hip Hop album would you guys consider THE BEST OF ALL TIME!!!???……One 1 album you can choose.

Even though it is a major release and has a smash hit single on it, I would still choose Commons “Like Water For Chocolate” my all time favorite underground. I still consider this album underground hip hop because of its conscious content as well as its gritty and original sound.

What is your definition of “underground Hip Hop”.

An album that has a raw texture to it and it’s content that is not widely accepted by Pop culture. I consider conscious rap, grunge hop to be a few of the many forms of underground hip hop.

Where can people find you on the web? Drop all the vital links.

https://www.instagram.com/jmisjustme

https://www.diggersfactory.com/vinyl/234182/jmisjustme-justme-being-me

https://music.apple.com/us/album/justme-being-me/1540588907?uo=4&app=music&at=1001lry3&ct=dashboard

The post Q&A With Los Angeles Rapper JMisJustMe first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.
Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Q&A With Milano Constantine & Body Bag Ben About Their New Album, “Write It in Blood”

– How did you first connect? And was it always the intention of collaborating for a body of work? Please detail the process of how, “Write It in Blood came to fruition. 

Milano:  We actually worked before on a joint called “Don’t Become a Victim” off my collab EP with Planet Asia. Peace to my Brothers DJ Enyoutee, Jay Royal And Planet Asia. That’s when I First Heard about BBB on the production side.

Body Bag Ben: Yah, after “Don’t Become a Victim” it was a no-brainer to collab for a full body of work.

– What prompted you both to lead off with the album single, “The Hearse” back in February? And how has the track/video been received? 

Milano: We wanted to drop something for the people. Plus It’s metaphorical…we’re really going to come body the competition [laughs].

Body Bag Ben: We just wanted to get something out there for the people and start getting the ball rolling.

– Upon release of “The Hearse” the album was announced with the working title, 2 Kings. What prompted the title change, and how did you come up with the idea for the new album title? 

Milano: I produced a track called “Write It in Blood.” It was only right we went with that title. It’s It sums up the passion we write with through all the blood, sweat and tears.

Body Bag Ben: Yah after that track was completed, it just felt right for that to be the album title. We both really tapped in with the pen on this one.

Body Bag Ben, for those unfamiliar, please shed some light on your background. Considering your multi-faceted skill set, did you begin your foray into hip-hop first as a deejay, emcee or producer? And at what point did you decide to collaborate with other emcees? Please detail.

You know what’s funny about that is I started deejaying when I was like 12-13. Shit just stuck with me. I got into beat boxing, break dancing and emceeing not to long afterwards, probably around 14. I started playing instruments at a young age as well, and producing kind of just came natural to me. I’ve always had a passion for working with other artists to create some wild shit. I was in multiple bands growing up, we were signed to a record label, toured all over and all that stuff, so having that collaborative spirit has always been a thing for me.

Milano, your career has had a strong second wind over the past few years. Do you find most of your fanbase familiar with you from your D.I.T.C. affiliation, or do you feel that you’ve been discovered in recent years more so on the merit of your music. Please detail.

I believe it’s a 50/50 split. I’m Heavily ingrained in D.I.T.C’s history and have been featured on their albumsWorldwide (2000) and Street Talk (2005), records like “Where You At?” featuring Big Pun & Big L (RIP) as well as “Hey Luv” from OC And Cuban Link. Since 2016 I’ve dropped verses for Hus Kingpin, SmooVth and many other dope emcees to branch out. In 2017 my brothers DJ Skizz, Marco Polo and I gave the people, The Way We Were LP. In 2018 I dropped Attaché Case, produced entirely by Oh Jay. Being consistent is key, so in 2019 I dropped two more projects; Boulevard Author, produced entirely by Showbiz, and DJ Enyoutee Presents: The Planet Asia & Milano Constantine EP, which Is Insane.

– Milano, What’s your favorite track off the EP, and why? And please reference your favorite bar from this song that highlights your elite level lyricism. 

I love “Sparks Steak House” for the Emotion I put into the bars: “You hear that Dirt Cranking, this is God’s work, TD Jakes Kirk Franklin / $500 a plate at the Banquet / Silk handkerchiefs, Bally’s near my ankle shit”

Check out the world premiere of, “Sparks Steak House” right here courtesy of UGHHBLOG: 

– Body Bag Ben, what’s your favorite beat that you produced on this EP that you feel really showcases your prowess as a producer? Please explain.

I like them all [laughs], but probably “Hell or High Water,” it just has that energy you know. *Peep an exlcusive snippet on Instagram.

– Body Bag Ben, when compared to other artists that you’ve collaborated with, what is it about Milano that stands out and makes him unique from the pack. Please detail.

On top of being a really dope emcee and producer he’s a stand up dude, that to me means more then anything when I’m working with people. This project turned into a friendship for sure.

– Milano, considering that BBB produced the lions share of the album, at what point was it decided to include your own production for the album cuts, “Sparks Steak House” and “Write It in Blood”?

We were probably about five or six songs deep. I know Ben was only going to give me that gritty shit. So I wanted to switch the mood with something soulful yet sinister on “Sparks Steak House.” Then I just went straight for the jugular when I chopped up, “Write it In Blood.”

– Body Bag Ben, due to the pandemic, I realize the opportunity to record together was not possible. That said, did you produce tracks for this album specifically with Milano in mind, or did you send him beats that you had already produced for him to choose from? And being that you’re on opposite coasts, please detail the recording process. Would you track your vocals first, and send ‘em off to Milano to add his verses, or visa versa? Please detail

This year’s has been tough for everyone and to be honest this project was built so organically that it sounds like we recorded it together in a studio. We definitely played off each others energy; he would send his verses I would send him mine and it just worked out perfect man. I couldn’t be happier with the final product.” 

– Now that the project is complete and ready to be delivered to the masses, please detail what you would like fans and listeners to take away from the project. Please detail.  

Milano: I want the masses to walk through this musical art gallery of emotions and leave saying, “we just witnessed Basquiat and Rembrandt in the flesh”…audio art. 

Body Bag Ben: I want people to break their neck rockin’ to these joints! I want people to say there’s not one track worth skipping. From top to the bottom we both worked hard on this and we did it for the listeners, word up.

– Please reference your forthcoming projects for 2021 that you’re at liberty to speak upon:

Milano: We have an album with Showbiz & D.I.T.C titled, Place Your Bets, a project with DJ Swet from Spain tentatively titled, Block Work. We working…God bless.

Body Bag Ben: I have an LP with J-Scienide, an EP with Chino XL and an EP with Rick Hyde. All have crazy features on them. And that’s just what I know is happening 100%. I’m always looking towards the future you know. 

– And now for our infamous question. Body Bag Ben, what’s your definition of underground hip-hop? 

Body Bag Ben: To me, underground hip-hop is a combination of a shared history, a brotherhood compartmentalized through love and pain. You can’t fake the feeling when it hits you. You know it’s real. 

Write It in Blood is available now for pre-order and drops next Tuesday, Dec. 29th. Click here to support☛ https://smarturl.it/WriteItInBlood

Tracklist:

  1. Live From the Wasteland (Intro)
  2. Hell or High Water
  3. Jesus Pieces
  4. The Hearse 
  5. Sparks Steak House (prod. Milano Constantine) 
  6. Jazz Cafe
  7. Sobre 
  8. Primavera 
  9. Write It in Blood (feat. Planet Asia) (prod. by Milano Constantine) 
  10. Brutus
  11. Vicious (feat. Supreme Cerebral)

Milano Constantine: 

Body Bag Ben Online: 

The post Q&A With Milano Constantine & Body Bag Ben About Their New Album, “Write It in Blood” first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.
Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Q&A With Elxtt

Hey Elxtt! Please tell us how many years you’ve been making music?

I’ve been making music for about 6 years. I went on a 2 and a half year hiatus but began rapping again this summer.

How did you get your EMCEE name Elxtt?

My rap name is a combination of the first 2 letters of my first name (Elorm) and the last 2 of my last name (Attor).

Tell us about your first ever debut track you put out? When was this?

I was initially in a rap group back in high school and made a joint with my homie titled ‘Crank It Up’. It was the first time in a studio and I remember being super nervous but I knew rapping is what i want to do when the engineer played my verse back. Surreal feeling. That was back in 2012.

How are you coping with this whole Covid 19 situation?

It was honestly frustrating when everything started getting shut down and we were on lockdown but things seem to be getting back to normal now. Down here in the A, everything seems to be open now. I just try to stay safe and do the basic stuff to avoid catching the virus (masks, sanitizers etc)

Please breakdown the creative process of your latest album “Hell of a Year”. And tell us a little about the album cover concept! That cover art is CRAZY!!!

The whole purpose of this tape was to first of all find my niche and figure out what style of rap people gravitate towards more and what I am most comfortable in making. Track 1-14 are intentionally very much different from each other. I also made this tape as my form of therapy to speak about the crazy year we’ve had from my perspective.

In regards to the cover art it’s taken from one of my fav visual artist of all times, James Jean and I chose it as my cover art because I felt like it portrayed how I felt about this year. The art is a sculpture of a boy with a slingshot with a golden eye in it. When I first saw it the 2 words I could use to describe it were ‘strange’ and ‘thought provoking’. Those two words were also the words that I felt described this year from my perspective so I knew it was the perfect cover for the tape.

Your honest opinion, out of all the songs on the project, which is the one song you feel stands out the most!?

Honestly all the songs stand out in their own way since they are all so different, but based on the numbers, my audience seem to like ‘Rico Suave’ the most. Personally my fav track is ‘Blood on my Jordans’, but ‘Therapy Session’ is definitely the most important track on the album for me.

We have to ask, with all this social discourse and revolt, protesting and rioting, exposed police brutality toward blacks and BLM, how do you guys feel about this? We would love your perspective on the climate we are living in right now?

I feel like the country is in a position that is so critical for the the future generation. Racism is something that is obviously a major issue in this country and I do strongly believe the first step of resolving this issue is raising awareness and shedding light on the problem. In this situation, protesting is the one major way to get our voices heard and I really do feel like progress is being made and our actions now will make life easier for the next generation, the same way the civil rights movements decades ago made life a bit easier for blacks and other minorities today.

Did you vote this year?

I couldn’t unfortunately cause I’m not eligible. Hopefully I’d be able to in 2024.

If it came down to 1 ALBUM only, what underground Hip Hop album would you consider THE BEST OF ALL TIME!!!???……One 1 album you can choose.

The best hiphop album of all time in my opinion is My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy by Kanye. The most complete body of work.

What is your definition of “underground Hip Hop”.

Underground hiphop is a culture of MCs and creatives that really just want to go back to the basics of hiphop, which is just rap. At the end of the day we just tryna spit cause that’s what makes us feel the most fulfilled. That’s real hiphop.

Where can people find you on the web? Drop all the vital links.

I’m on Instagram (@el.xtt) and Twitter (@elxtt) and my project ‘Hell Of A Year’ is on all streaming platforms.

https://t.co/s7YuIVRFKt

 

The post Q&A With Elxtt first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.
Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Q&A With Queens Based Hip Hop Artist Apokalips The Archangel

Much salute to you and your recent album “1137Q” It’s absolutely FIRE!! For all the readers who don’t know, how did you get your artist name Apokalips The Archangel?

I got my name from the negative and positive vibes shown throughout my music. The negative vibe is Apokalips. When I speak about the End Of Dayz, I am referring to my born day December 21st, which is one of the days the world was predicted to end. My positive vibe is The Archangel. I always express positivity in my concept songs. I believe that the world needs hope and guidance at times and the Archangel is a symbol of that!

Tell us about the Hip Hop scene out in Jackson Heights, Queens.

The underground Hip Hop scene in Jackson Heights Queens is alive and well! I grew up rhyming with many M.C’s from My hood who are featured on my previous albums that You can Find on My Bandcamp Page. Most of whom are still doing their thing. Queen’s MCs always have and always will be A staple in the underground Hip Hop culture!

What’s the earliest hip hop memory you can recall?

The earliest Hip-Hop memory I can recall is watching video music box after Elementary school while I did my homework. Shout to Ralph Mcdaniels! Watching these old school videos showed all elements of Hip-Hop from the DJ to breaking, graffiti, and of course the art of lyricism. I also remember going to the record store with my older sister to copp my first Hip-Hop vinyl which was Big Daddy Kane ‘AINT NO HALF STEPPIN’!

Who’re some of your biggest musical inspirations?

Some of my biggest musical inspirations were Run Dmc, Eric B & Rakim, Kool G Rap, Big Daddy Kane, Nas, Biggie, Tupac, Wu Tang Clan, Mobb Deep and Big Pun. Other inspirations were Frank Sinatra, Michael Jackson, Earth Wind and Fire! I Love All Genres Of Music.

Are you a movie buff?  Almost every rapper we come across, they all have this is common.  What’re your top 3 insperational movies?

I am definitely a movie Buff! My top three inspirational movies are Beat Street, Breaking, and Krush Groove. All inspirational Hip-Hop movies. If we had more time I could break down every genre but that’s a whole other interview!

How are you coping with this whole Covid 19 situation? Has it delayed any new music production by any chance?

Coping with the COVID-19 situation has no doubt been a challenge for everyone! Personally I have been fortunate to be able to work through the whole pandemic and continue to provide for my family. The number one thing for me is staying safe out there and keeping a positive mental. The pandemic has definitely delayed the release of my new album, which we were hoping to release a couple of months ago. But it is what it is, and the project is out now available on my Bandcamp page. I’m very excited to share the project with the world. We took Our time with this one and put this Project together for the Hood. All Tracks were Produced by My Brother Seasra23. My Top Shelf Muzik Partner. Salute to everyone supporting the album!

Much respect on your record label TOPSHELFMUZIK!  Tell us about the origins of it.  Are you guys signing artists?

Top Shelf Muzik originated in the studio. My homie SEASRA23, Who grew up in the next town Woodside hit me up in 2011. We linked up in the lab and began creating tracks together. Not too long after that I wrote a song called Top Shelf Muzik, which is actually on this album! We took that title and ran with it. At the moment we are focused on our in-house producers and artists, but if any new Hip-Hop artist wants to hit us up feel free to do so.

You recently dropped your brand new album “1137Q”. What was the inspiration behind that? Dope album cover!!!

The inspiration behind my new album 1137Q was representing the hood where I was raised and never forgetting where I came from! Jackson Heights, Queens New York City ZIP Code 11372. It’s very important to never forget your roots. No matter how big you get or how far you go in life, never forget where it all started and the people who helped you progress on your journey! Good looks, the album cover is an original drawing created by a legendary Queens graffiti artist. In every project I drop I always try to represent all elements of underground Hip-Hop. Hence the graffiti cover and a couple of tracks featuring DJs cutting up intros and hooks.

We have to ask, with all this social discourse and revolt, protesting and rioting, exposed police brutality toward blacks and BLM, how do you feel about this? We would love your perspective on the climate we are living in right now.

The climate we are living in right now is a mess! Police brutality has been going on forever. I myself was a victim of this in my younger years growing up in the hood. It’s about time people stood up for themselves and exposed the corrupt system minorities have been dealing with for ages. I salute all the people protesting peacefully to ensure a better future for our children. People shouldn’t be afraid to voice their opinions on the subject and let their voices be heard. So many people have died or been incarcerated by a corrupt system that clearly targets lower class
communities that are already struggling with poverty. Basically the government is a bully preying on the ghetto. It’s only right that we unite and stand up together so we receive the freedom and respect every human being deserves.

Our most important question: What’s your definition of underground hip hop?

My definition of underground Hip-Hop is a platform for individuals to express themselves through beats and rhymes. It is an opportunity to let your voice be heard by others who can relate. It is a culture, lifestyle, and art form. It can be so many things to each individual in many different ways. Personally, as an artist music is my escape from reality. It is how I Vent my frustration. It Is also how I express my feelings. Without music it would be hard to cope with life. Not just Hip-Hop but all genres of music. Every genre of music can be applied to each aspect of life! Shout out to all the underground Hip-Hop MC’s, Producers, Engineers, and DJ’s keeping the culture
alive!

Any plans for the upcoming year?

Hopefully 2021 will be a better year for everyone. Top Shelf Muzik Will continue to produce quality Hip-Hop for the masses. We will be dropping new projects with some dope producers,new visuals and some new features and collaborations. The grind don’t stop so we will continue working on keeping the true essence of underground Hip-Hop alive! Once again shout out to everyone keeping the culture alive!

Lastly, is there any advice you have for anyone trying to set their foot in as recording artists?

My advice to any upcoming Hip-Hop artist is just to be yourself. Don’t change to impress anyone or sell your soul for money. For every person that doesn’t feel your music or wants to change you, there is another who will feel your music and appreciate your vibe. Also, have patience! Success isn’t achieved overnight, it takes time and dedication! Pay your dues and always remain humble!

The post Q&A With Queens Based Hip Hop Artist Apokalips The Archangel first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.
Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Q&A Interview With Hip Hop Artist Skate Cobain

Hey Skate Cobain! Please tell us how long have you been making music?

Aww man I been doing music since like 9th grade.

Most importantly, how did you come up with your rap name?

I didn’t really it’s just what that called me in the hood I was the only nigga Skating so they start calling me Skate.

What separates you from all the other rappers from your city?

I’m my own man I started something and stuck wit it I don’t really see any competition bcuz I respect the real ones in the town and they respect me.

So we read you a part of a few collectives and groups!! Please break down the origins regarding your group history in Hip Hop? How long have you been solo?

Well I’m apart of one group it’s always been one group OOZE GANG but it’s just the guys man GAINE$ HOOD TONEYBOI JC GINO and ME. We started making music a long time ago lol back when they laughed at you for doing something different but shit we here now. And I’m not Solo I just dropped a solo tape bcuz ppl always ask for it and I had the bug.

In a few words, how would you describe your sound?

Damn I never really thought about my sound I guess it’s a mix of fire ass beats with me talking my shit its I’m giving incite it’s just Clever Conversational Shit and if you listen close I give you the recipe a few times.

How are you coping with this whole Covid 19 situation? Has it delayed any new music production by any chance?

I’m chillin I’m already a clean mf so we still washing our hands you feel me? Lol And the music didn’t slow down. I’m always on my own time with that, I just make it when I feel it.

Please breakdown the creative process of your new album “The Art of Procrastination 2“. And tell us a little about the album cover concept!

I used this project to show how people who wouldn’t necessarily meet from my city could be apart of a cohesive project. I used the sounds that interested me the most at the time to bring together people like Bendy Face, Lordy, breeze fiend, and neftali and more and show the versatility of the buffalo sound. As far as the album cover concept I just wanted to show where I came from to where I am the baby pictures and all the collage work was just to show my transformation Big shoutout to Kahlil Senpai on that my boy always bless me.

Your honest opinion, out of all the songs on the project, which is the one song you feel stands out the most!?

It would have to be Slow Down or Tony Hawk Pro Skater.

We have to ask, with all this social discourse and revolt, protesting and rioting, exposed police brutality toward blacks and BLM, how do you feel about this? We would love your perspective on the climate we are living in right now?

Slime at the end of the day mf tired of that same old regime, it’s time to scramble some shit up.

Did you vote this year?

Yes definitely voted it’s my chance to be heard you know?

If it came down to 1 ALBUM only, what underground Hip Hop album would you consider THE BEST OF ALL TIME!!!???……One 1 album you can choose.

Gaine$-Tuxedo Dreams.

Here it is! Our most popular question! What is your definition of “underground hip hop”?

Anything made with love minus all the labels and theatrics.

Where can people find you on the web? Drop all the vital links.

https://linktr.ee/Oozegang222

The post Q&A Interview With Hip Hop Artist Skate Cobain first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.

Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Down To Earth: A Conversation With UFO Fev

UFO-FEV.jpg

Few MCs have the ability to paint a real-life picture through honest, yet intricate lyrics as Spanish Harlem’s UFO Fev. Not only that, but Fev has been a magnet for respect from some of Hip Hop’s most celebrated and respected figures such as Fat Joe, Diddy and Black Rob to name a few. We at UGHHBLOG got the chance to chop it up with the Big UFO and learn more about his story and what he has in store.

What can you tell us about growing up in Spanish Harlem and how did your surroundings/upbringing lead you start MCing?

Growing up in Spanish Harlem as I look back in hindsight, was normal in the sense of growing up with everyone around you in poverty. The events that happen around you aren’t normal, you learn to adapt or your family is lucky enough to move out. I’ve never truly left because my family is still there, so I’m still in tune. Becoming an emcee came from being in love with hip-hop, growing with the culture you had to do something when we were younger, dance, graffiti, DJ, something in the culture. I DJ’d and did some graf but writing was always a passion.

How did you get the name UFO Fev?

I got the name UFO Fev in two parts, Fev came from the good brother and multi platinum recording artist Black Rob. We’re from the same housing projects, we bumped into each other day humbly. He mentioned he heard I was rhyming and that I had “a little fever”. As we parted, the compliment stuck with me so much I decided to use it. UFO came as I gained knowledge of self and began to formulate my own beliefs of the world. Plus, the way I rhyme you never seen nothing like it.

So Black Rob is from the same building as you? That’s dope! How did Black Rob and having family in the industry help inspire you to take rapping more seriously?

Black Rob is from my building, his family lived on the first floor. I’m from the 7th floor, he’s few years my senior so he basically knew me before I knew myself, along with my dad being in the group TKA. I didn’t get inspired to take music seriously until I was living on my own and had to decide what my future would be. I didn’t want to be in the streets forever, nor did I want a 9-5 forever and I’ve always rapped but making music was a sacrifice I had to commit to. That commitment formed and I hit the ground running.

Being around established artists and sort of being a fly on the wall must have helped you develop an understanding of the rap game early on. How do you think your approach set you apart from others in your neighborhood who aspired to MC?

Being around established artist early taught me to write music, touch different topics. Hip-Hop isn’t necessarily aggressive music, it started out as story telling, from all different authors. Now we made it tough, but it was struggle music. I learned to express myself in my lyrics through poetry early on and then I hit a point where I didn’t have to make up stories because they were going on in my life, right in front of me. Which set me apart from everyone else because the content was deeper.

Absolutely, we can hear the authenticity in your lyrics, so how would you describe your rhyme style?

I would describe my rhyme style like water, I adapt to my environment. People enjoy what they enjoy from my music because they know it’s going be different every time but constant quality.

Your first real project was with Element called “Around My Way,” how did that shape your approach with your project “Taxes” later down the road?

“Around My Way” shaped the approach to “Taxes” because it taught me business at a time where I had no clue. Making Taxes, Rich Lou and I were both in a losing environment and wanted to prove ourselves for whatever reason, we did it. Also put me on track to making shorter cohesive projects.

So is it true that Puffy called you after hearing “Taxes?” That’s wild. I’m sure that was the motivational boost you needed to continue making music. Can you describe what it was like to get that call?

Puff called at a time where I was doubting myself. In hindsight it was very motivational, that’s what I needed to pick myself up and keep going at a time when it looked like there wasn’t anywhere else to go. I can’t tell you how I got the call, it just happened from one moment to the next, they say people like that find you. They really do.

So you drop your next project “Camoflauge” and get contacted by Dre of Cool & Dre, which ended up with you meeting Fat Joe. How did that come about and how did developing a relationship with Joe transpire?

Same thing, when people like that are looking for you, they find you. Dre seen “Mr. Nice Guy” on social media which I believe led to him playing it for Crack. Dre found my number thru a homie in my neighborhood and from there he went on to tell me Joe wanted to meet me. Developing a relationship with Joe took years, I am still developing our relationship lol. We got unconditional love, he changed my life.

Can you describe your current relationship with Fat Joe and how he has helped shape you both as an artist and performer?

My relationship with Joe is a friendship, he’s a legend. As an artist and performer he’s helped shape my understanding of just everything like a veteran point guard teaching a younger point guard how to read the floor.

I understand Termanology linked you with Statik Selektah, what was it like working with Statik on your collab project “Fresh Air?

Working on Fresh Air with Statik was a dope experience, Statik is a beast. He works quick so you have to be able to provide high quality content at  a fast pace.

fev-statik.jpg

The Ghost of Albizu” is one of this years best projects in my opinion, how did you link up with Big Ghostand develop the idea for this project?

Thank you, linking with Big Ghost took years lol. All jokes aside it wasn’t overnight it took a minute for him to send me the music he felt was right for me. Ghost only makes entire projects so he works like a craftsman. Everything is fine tuned sonically, we took our time to make sure things were right. The idea was born out of a comment on IG from a mutual supporter which led to Ghost and I building on the brand from there.

How long did it take for you and Ghost to craft “Albizu?” I heard you took a trip to Puerto Rico around the time you were working on the project. How did that trip inspire your approach to making the project?

It took maybe about a year and change to get what we have now. That includes recording and bouncing vocals back and forth, exchanging ideas and stuff like that. My trip to Puerto Rico was life changing in the sense of I never got to experience the island looking to obtain knowledge. This time I got to sink my feet into the soil and soak it up. No music nothing just building.

Word! So what can we expect from The Big UFO in 2021?

In 2021 you can expect more music, more merch and a continuous level up. Vanderslice & I have something special cooked up, just look forward to more music!!

We always like to ask this question to wrap-up interviews, what is your definition of the “underground?”

My definition of the Underground is anything made before money hits it. After that it’s a different thing.

The post Down To Earth: A Conversation With UFO Fev first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.

Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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Q&A Interview With Trizzy Trav

Hey Trizzy Trav! Please tell us how long have you been making music? Most importantly, how did you come up with your rap name?

I’ve been doing this since 2013 with my team and brand, Loyalty Life. My name comes from my big bro. My name originally was T.Dot but when he passed I changed it to Trizzy Trav cuz that’s always what he used to call me. It’s my way of bringing him along with me on this journey.

What separates you from all the other rappers from your city?

I think my upbringing is what makes me unique. My family is west indian, from St. Thomas. So we barely listen to hip hop to begin with. Then I’m born and raised in Jersey. Then I moved to Buffalo during college so that’s 3 different cultures. 3 different styles and sounds. I try to mix them all together to create one unique sound.

In a few words, how would you describe your sound?

Motivational. Inspirational. I make music from goal driven individuals and I try to make my music sound like that. I want you to listen to my music and say “Ok, I’m ready to go get a bag” or “I’m ready to go workout.” Whatever it is you got on your mind I want you to conquer it and be the best version of yourself while doing it.

How are you coping with this whole Covid 19 situation? Has it delayed any new music production by any chance?

As far as music production goes, everything is pretty much in-house so no delays there. Shows definitely took a toll though. I had some shows lined up this past spring and then Covid came and stopped all that. It definitely forced me to try and get more creative because of that. I feel like you’re competing with people’s leisure time much more now because everyone’s attention is being taken up in the house by watching movies on Netflix.

Please breakdown the creative process of your new album “Glass Ceiling“. And tell us a little about the album cover concept!

I wanted to bring you into the thoughts and conscience of someone who wants to accomplish their goals and dreams at any cost. In the midst of that, there are roadblocks and self doubt that you come across. I wanted to share mine and how I dealt with them. From relationships, to self doubt, to sometimes having to take a detour, to things not going your way. I tried to touch on how these things can steer you away from the goal and because of that, you can get in this space where you think that you’re stuck. But you’re not stuck. Actually, you never stuck. That’s the glass ceiling. You have to break through it. Which is why I wanted the artwork to show me breaking through that ceiling. Shoutout to 3K for creating the artwork. And if you listen closely to some of the ending of the songs, you’ll hear glass cracking. Going through every situation is actually breaking that ceiling little by little. Until you actually break through.

Your honest opinion, out of all the songs on the project, which is the one song you feel stands out the most!?

That’s tough because they all give you a different feel so it can really depend on what kind of mood you’re in at the moment. As of late, I’ve been listening to passion vs. action pt. II. That song makes me reflect on a lot of things I’ve been through. The more I listen to it, the more I tell myself I gotta make a part three.

We have to ask, with all this social discourse and revolt, protesting and rioting, exposed police brutality toward blacks and BLM, how do you feel about this? We would love your perspective on the climate we are living in right now?

I usually have a blind eye to these things cuz let’s be honest. How long has the same thing been going on? Since I was born for sure. And it feels like it never changes. But something about my son getting older made me have to think. I have to raise a black man and he needs to know what’s going on and how to handle himself out here. So I became more active. I did more research. How can we really change things? Marching is cool. Protesting is cool. But where’s the action and what can we really do? So I tried to educate my son as much as I can cuz honestly I think it’s in the younger generation’s hands to take action. It’s the older generation’s responsibility to educate the youth and do what we can. I actually stopped making this project and I made an EP called What Was In Store over the summer. It’s about 5-6 songs about how I felt and my views and thoughts. Just wanted to contribute to the awareness in a different way along with the protests in my own way.

Did you vote this year?

Of course! Mail-in ballot. Get the orange man out of there!

If it came down to 1 ALBUM only, what underground Hip Hop album would you consider THE BEST OF ALL TIME!!!???……One 1 album you can choose.

Well for me, it would definitely have to be a Little Brother album. Were they still considered underground when Getback came out? If not that, then The Minstrel Show for sure. I always loved their sound. They influenced a lot of people’s favorite rappers.

Here it is! Our most popular question! What is your definition of “underground hip hop”?

To me, underground hip hop is that diamond in the rough. I feel like people appreciate underground so much more because it’s something that you searched for that you can’t find anywhere else. Once you find it, you feel like it’s yours and you cherise it.

Where can people find you on the web? Drop all the vital links.

Just google Trizzy Trav. Everything will pop up.
www.trizzytrav.com
IG: @loyaltylifetrizzy
Twitter: @trizzy_trav_
And make sure you head over to www.theselsdifferent.com and cop you some merch!

The post Q&A Interview With Trizzy Trav first appeared on UndergroundHipHopBlog.

Source: UndergroundHipHopBlog.com

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