Tag Archives: Cypress Hill

Talib Kweli & B-Real Discuss People Of Color Being Blocked Out Of Legal Cannabis

B-Real is the latest guest on People’s Party With Talib Kweli. There, the member of Cypress Hill and Prophets Of Rage tells the co-founder of Black Star and Reflection Eternal about the origins of his groups. The Los Angeles, California native breaks down Cypress’ distinction among the the handful of artists on SNL‘s all-time “banned” list. The legendary MC/producer/entrepreneur also opens up about his neighborhood ties, and how gang graffiti coined him a name that he’s kept hot for nearly 30 years. In addition to music, B-Real and Talib discuss cannabis. Apart from “Dr. Green Thumb” recalling his days rolling with Brand Nubian to Harlem to cop a legendary strain en route to New Rochelle, B-Real offers some blunt reality surrounding the booming bud business. Bun B Tells Talib Kweli Why T.R.O.Y. Is The Biggest Hip-Hop Song Of All Time (Video) At 43:00, Talib describes the efficiency of recently buying cannabis at a dispensary in Colorado. “It was so easy, and I got really good weed. I was amazed at how people are caking up on it. But the Black and Brown people are locked out of that. It’s hard for us to even get into those spaces when we took the risk—our communities took the risk.” B-Real, who is involved with Gas Co. (and wears the hat for his appearance) responds, “They have this thing called social equity, which means if you’re an offender, where you’ve been convicted of a sort of cannabis-related crime, it’s supposed to put you in the front of the line [to get sanctions]. And for most, it does. And that’s a lot of Black and Brown people that can apply and actually get some of these licenses. But the problem is, a lot of us can’t afford those. And when we try to come into the scenario, we usually come in by ourselves, independent, with not much financial backing. They make it very hard for us to exist in that market because of what it costs to actually invest in actually becoming a cannabis brand or company. Supposedly, the system is that at some point, if you can’t afford that permit, they have a backup fund that pays for it for you because they want these permits working. But the problem is, even if they give you that, you still have to have the capital to actually start the business. My advice to any Black and Brown person trying to get in the game: there’s a lot of people operating sort of the same way that the corporate structure does. The corporate [structure] is a collective of a lot of people with money, obviously. They move all their money pretty much together. So what a lot of people are doing now is they’re partnering up with people that want to invest in the cannabis game, but they’re all investing together and going in as one. That’s what our folks need to do: they need to f*ckin’ get together.” Kweli summarizes, “Collective and cooperative economics.” B-Real Details How He Developed 1 Of Hip-Hop’s Most Distinctive Voices (Video) Co-host Jasmin Leigh interjects that she noticed a Black-owned dispensary in her neighborhood becoming white-owned overnight. B-Real explains, “They’re not making it easier for us. But that’s why I say we have to sort of unify our money and sort of move together in that business to have a presence there. They’re not gonna make it easy for us. They’ve made it easy for the corporate structure to get in. It’s just that some people have figured out how the corporations move.” B-Real notes that his proposed strategy has worked, and private investors have found success without outside backing. “It’s just a matter of people approaching the right people within our community and saying, ‘Hey, let’s move in this together.’ Like you see, a lot of athletes now are getting into the cannabis sector.” Kweli draws on what B-Real says regarding Black and Brown unity and stresses the importance of that bond regarding issues approaching the 2020 election. The two veteran artists move into politics for the close of the extensive and dynamic discussion. Fab 5 Freddy’s Documentary Sets The Record Straight About A Chronic Problem (Video Trailer) Elsewhere in the interview, B-Real describes bringing in percussionist Eric Bobo as an official member of Cypress Hill. He also describes an especially significant episode of his Smoke Box involving Pop/Rock singer Melissa Etheridge. #BonusBeat: Talib Kweli and B-Real were both featured on Chris Webby’s 2015 song “Dopamine,” which also has Trae Tha Truth and Grafh:

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

https://www.itshiphop.com/forums/forum/news-events/hip-hop-news/1858442-talib-kweli-b-real-discuss-people-of-color-being-blocked-out-of-legal-cannabis

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The 2019 tour begins tomorrow! Hit the link for tickets and dates!

The 2019 tour begins tomorrow! Hit the link for tickets and dates! http://bit.ly/CypressTour


Source: Cypress Hill On Facebook

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What an amazing day this was!

What an amazing day this was!


Source: Cypress Hill On Facebook

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B-Real & Brady Watt Add Some Dr. Dre & DJ Premier To Cypress Hill’s Biggest Hits

Renowned bass player, producer, and member of DJ Premier’s Badder Band Brady Watt has been bringing his groove to video lately, linking up with MCs and singers for a series of videos he’s calling “Bass & Bars.” Each entry has Watt laying down a bassline for a guest to recite a beloved verse or two from their career. Previous entries in his series include Bun B, Pharoache Monch and MC Eiht. This week, Watt links up with Cypress Hill frontman B-Real as he delivers two classic Cypress Hill verses from 1993’s “Insane In the Brain” and 1991’s “How I Could Just Kill A Man” breakout. B-Real Details How He Developed 1 Of Hip-Hop’s Most Distinctive Voices (Video) As B-Real takes us through his memorable “Insane In the Brain,” Watt enthusiastically rocks alongside the MC, recreating the beat purely on bass. B-Real drops his classic bars on point: “To the one on the flamboyant tempa, / Just toss that ham in the frying pan / Like spam, get done when I come and slam, Damn, I feel like the Son of Sam / Don’t make me wreck sh*t, hectic / Next get the chair got me going like General Electric / ‘Aaaant,’ the lights are blinking, I’m thinking, It’s all over when I go out drinking.” As B-Real spits his last four bars, Watt slickly transitions into a cool rendition of Gang Starr’s “DWYCK,” produced by his band-mate, DJ Premier. As Watt fades out from “DWYCK,” he plays a bass rendition of the “How I Could Just Kill A Man” beat. B-Real dives into his first verse on Cypress Hill’s first ever single, and infamous track off the Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas soundtrack. Before B-Real finishes his verse, Watt slides right into a bass cover of Dr. Dre’s “Dre Day” beat, switching pace with absolute ease. MC Eiht & Brady Watt Make A Westside Connection On A New Version Of m.A.A.d. City Both B-Real and Brady Watt prove that they’re skilled in their lanes by never missing their cue, and delivering their respective crafts on-point. #BonusBeat: Watch Bun B spit vintage verses from “Get Throwed” and “Draped Up” alongside Watt on bass.

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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Eric Sermon Says He Has New And Exclusive Music With Prodigy and Sean Price (Coming Real Soon)

Eric Sermon stopped by The Breakfast Club to catch everyone up on what he has been doing over the past few years. From starting his new streaming service to figuring out inexpensive ways to pay for samples, he is making some very respectable moves in 2019. However, what do people want most form the E Double? WE WANT MUSIC… (read it like the song). Well, Sermon says that he has music coming to fans by the summer.

READ MORE: Erick Sermon Recruits Ghostface Killah, Pharrell, Styles P and More For New Album “Go”

Entitled the Dynamic Duo, this project will feature all of the top duos that he has worked with over his career. As one might imagine, just glancing over his extensive discography, he has worked with everyone.  Names like RUN DMC, Redman & Method Man, Roger Troutman, Heavy D, Shaq, George Clinton, Keith Murray, LL Cool J, Bounty Killa, AZ, JAY-Z, Mos Def, Too Short, 50 Cent,  Ludacris, Busta Rhymes BBD and even the queen BEYONCÉ, simply illuminate his production discography.  But with this project, he is primed to outdo many of those aforementioned projects.

READ MORE: Queenie Recalls Bun B’s Shoot Out With Home Invader on ‘The Breakfast Club’

While Charlamagne Tha God suggested some standout duos that might be on the project. Sermon did not confirm or deny, but did drop a few acts that might tickle the fancy of true fans. Black Star with Mos Def and Talib Kweli are on deck. Heltah Skeltah with Rock and the late great Sean Price. CNN with Capone and the podcast king, N.O.R.E. Head went on to list Cypress Hill, RED and Meth, Salt-N-Pepa, RUNDMC (really son), Naughty By Nature, Dogg Pound, M.O.P. Smif-N-Wessun, Eightball and MJG, and even Mobb Deep with a dope Havoc and a vibrant Prodigy (RIP).  He wanted to get Outkast, but said that was impossible to get done even though he spoke to Andre. He wanted A Tribe Called Quest, but that did not happen. We know that is because Malik (SIP) is with the angels.

When talking about the Mobb Deep track he said that Havoc had to walk out the room it is so good.

The interview revealed a lot about his relationship with PMD, his time in the legendary group EPMD that launched his career and how he got money when it was hard for east coast rappers to eat.

 

The post Eric Sermon Says He Has New And Exclusive Music With Prodigy and Sean Price (Coming Real Soon) appeared first on The Source.

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B-Real Details How He Developed 1 Of Hip-Hop’s Most Distinctive Voices (Video)

Guru famously proclaimed “It’s mostly the voice” on a Gang Starr song of the same name. Like the late, great Keith Elam, Cypress Hill and Prophets Of Rage member B-Real has one of the most recognizable voices in music. The Los Angeles, California veteran raps with clarity and a nasal breathing pattern. Live, songs often sounds just like they do on albums, which is one reason why his groups have dominated the festival circuit for nearly 30 years. Even before Cypress showed their faces on early single covers or their 1991 eponymous artwork, B’s voice (along with Sen Dog’s) stood apart from the Rap pack. The MC/producer/entrepreneur and media host is the latest guest on The Joe Rogan Experience. In the last several days, the newly-inducted member of Hollywood’s Walk Of Fame gives an incredible two-hour interview about his passion for cannabis awareness, his teens in a street-gang, and how almost overnight, Cypress Hill became celebrities that had a hard time being in public places. Cypress Hill’s Entire Next Album Will Be Produced By Black Milk (Video) At 48:00, Joe Rogan asks B-Real when he developed his trademark vocal style. “Once we started working on our Cypress Hill demos,” B responds. “[DJ] Muggs came to me and said, ‘Ay man, you gotta do something different. Otherwise, you’re gonna [only] write for Sen [Dog].’ ‘Cause Sen had a good voice; his sh*t was locked-in. My voice, I was rapping in a voice similar to the one I talk in. Although the rhymes were good, it didn’t cut through on the style on the beats. It just sounded like some regular sh*t. So…I didn’t want to be someone’s writer; I wanted to write for myself. There was a guy we used to listen to, coming up, his name was Rammellzee.” The New York City graffiti writer, painter, MC, and sculptor gained profile through Wild Style and Style Wars. The latter film, a documentary, included the K-Rob collaboration “Beat Bop.” Rammellzee died in 2010. “He was this rapper who was very obscure, but he was an artist too—a graffiti artist [and also a professional artist in galleries]. What he’d do is he’d rap in a regular style, like his talking voice, ‘This is the brother they call the Ramm-ell.” He had a deep voice like that. And then he’d flip, right in the middle [of a verse], ‘Take it uptown to Cypress Hill with the shotgun.‘ We were always freaking out that he had two styles. So I tried throwing my voice in that sort of similar style. And it ended up sticking. I didn’t think anybody was gonna like it.” They did. B-Real recalls exactly when this transformation happened. “I think the first song that came about in that style was the song ‘Real Estate.’ That’s where I tried it the first time. They liked it, so then [‘How I Could Just Kill A Man’] came next, then ‘Hand On The Pump.’ It just became [my] flow after that.” Cypress Hill Is The 1st Latino Hip-Hop Group On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame B-Real notes that the effort caused him strain on stage. “For the few years, I was trying to do the voice and I’d be getting over-hyped ’cause the crowd is hype, and I’d start yelling the verses instead of rapping them, like on the record. I’d throw my voice out. My voice would get scratchy; I’d start sounding like Busta Rhymes and sh*t. It took me five years to actually harness how to actually do the shows with this voice. I had to go to this Opera singer coach. Using former Opera singer and Hollywood veteran vocal coach Elisabeth Sabine, B-Real learned to project through his diaphragm, use circular breathing, and preserve his unmistakable voice. “I never went hoarse again after that. People often compliment me on sounding close to how the records are. I gotta give all props to her.” At 39:00, B-Real opens up about surviving some severe trauma in the streets of South Gate. Joe Rogan asks B-Real about his lung health, given all the years of heavy marijuana smoking. “I get physicals and stuff like that. Occasionally, I’ll have my lungs checked, and they’ll tell me they’re [in] great [condition].” The MC says that his fitness is to thank. “It’s a funny thing, ’cause in [approximately] 1987, I was 17, and I was gang-bangin’. I got shot. I got hit by a .22, and it—as hollow point [bullets] do, it broke into three pieces. One of them punctured my lung on my left side.” B-Real says that as a teen scared for his privacy, he did not divulge to doctors that he was an active pot smoker at the time of the shooting. “They said, ‘That’s good [you do not smoke], ’cause you’ll never smoke again. They punctured your lung.’ They thought I was gonna have to work off of one lung. But in the three days [of hospitalization at Lynwood’s Martin Luther King Hospital], they were able to get the blood out of the lung. I was able to get it back through the exercises they told me [to do] to get it back to its regular size. I’ve never had a problem since then, knock on wood.” Alchemist Tells B-Real About Just How Much His Time With Cypress Hill Shaped Him B-Real adds that the bullet fragments are still inside of his body. He reveals that the other two pieces are near his heart and spine. The one piece near his lung has moved. B-Real admits that he feels the lead on cold days. “I was livin’ crazy before I got into the music; the music saved my life.” Moments later, Dr. Greenthumb is very transparent about how street-gangs recruit. “Falling into the gangs, it’s easy. If you don’t have a good home-life, the guys on the street are your second family. They eventually become your first family. If you don’t have a father-figure at home, one of the guys in the gang becomes your mentor. He could become the guy you look up to as your father-figure. There’s that. Again, there’s not enough programs out there to keep people [engaged in] doing something different than falling into that. Sometimes it’s just a matter of you growing up in this neighborhood. If you have to walk down that street and they approach you and say, ‘Hey, you live in this ‘hood; you gotta be with us. If you don’t, we’re gonna make it hard for you.’ So there’s that peer pressure,” B-Real says. “Fortunately, I had friends that weren’t gang-bangers. They had talent for music, which was Muggs and Sen, and Sen’s brother Mello [Man Ace]. I did music as a hobby before I got into gangs, and they got me back into the music. ‘Cause they recognized something in me, and said, ‘Hey, we want you to come back where we got these opportunities over here. Come join us.” Elsewhere in the interview, B-Real admits that he was always carrying a handgun between 1989 and 1997, well into Cypress Hill’s stardom. At 43:45, B-Real is very blunt that one can never really leave a gang unless they are “jumped out.” However, he says that he changed his ways around 1988 when he was 18 years old. “I was too into it to be jumped-out like that. That wasn’t something I was gonna do. My boys that I ran with, they understood that I was trying to do something different. I made a choice to try the music and leave that sh*t alone, ’cause there’s no way you do both. If you do both, you see the results today with what’s happening with a lot of cats…when one bleeds into the other, it f*cks everything up.” Erick Sermon Discusses His New Vernia Album & Previews Music At 57:00, B-Real recalls Cypress Hill getting on. Philadelphia’s Joe “The Butcher” Nicolo was instrumental in getting the group signed to RuffHouse/Sony Records. Additionally, the MC says that EPMD helped spread some of Cypress’ biggest awareness, despite no formal affiliation. “When Sony put out our snippet tape, guys like EPMD [rallied for Cypress Hill]. They were one of our favorite groups in the world. They were Top 5 for Cypress Hill. It was Public Enemy, Beastie Boys, and EPMD. F*ck, they were the sh*t. Those were the guys that took our snippet tape, and they were showing our snippet tape to other rappers. Like, ‘Hey guys, look at these new f*ckin’ guys.’ Busta Rhymes told me this story: ‘Yo son, I heard your sh*t from EPMD way back in the day. They was playin’ it for Public Enemy, and I just happened to be in the room.’ Ice Cube, when we met him for the first time—and we had our ups and downs with him—but he’s one of my homies, he [said the same thing]. They were like our first street team, man. EPMD.” B-Real plugs Erick Sermon’s just-released album, Vernia. Later in the interview, B-Real reveals that his rapping style emerged out of writing poetry first. He says that he planned for a career in journalism and adapted those principles of non-fiction storytelling to songs like Cypress’ “Throw Your Set In The Air.” Elsewhere, he recalls House Of Pain’s Everlast “choking out” somebody in the Rainbow Room for continuously talking about him from a nearby table. The MC praises KRS-One as one of his leading influences. Redman Highlights Cypress Hill’s Green Thumb In Cultivating His Career (Video) Cypress Hill released Elephants On Acid last year with DJ Muggs back at the musical helm. The group has confirmed that Black Milk will produce their next LP.

Source: AmbrosiaForHeads.com

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Living Legends: Cypress Hill Receives Star On Hollywood Walk Of Fame

Cypress Hill

Source: photo: WENN

Cypress Hill made history this week! The Latino hip-hop group, hailed as one of the forefathers of West Coast rap, received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

 

At the ceremony, the legends were taken aback by all the love. Also worth noting: George Lopez and Xzibit shared a few words in their honor. “I was blown away” Sen Dog said, according to TMZ. “It was something we never expected.” Watch them pose with their star in the clip below, plus more footage and reactions from social media to follow.

Photo: WENN

Source: HipHopWired.com

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Look: Alchemist Congratulates Cypress Hill On Much-Deserved Hollywood Walk Of Fame Star

Alchemist Video

West Coast producer Alchemist is proud-proud. The hip-hop veteran hit up social media this week to congratulate California rap group Cypress Hill on landing a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The post Look: Alchemist Congratulates Cypress Hill On Much-Deserved Hollywood Walk Of Fame Star appeared first on SOHH.com.

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Cypress Hill to Receive Star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame

Legendary, West Coast Hip-Hop icons, Cypress Hill have received one of the biggest honors of their careers. After 30 years of being in the industry, the “Insane in the Membrane,” crew are set to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of fame. They will be the first Latino Hip-Hop group to have the recognition bestowed on them (Sen Dog, DJ Muggs, B-Real, and Eric Bobo are of Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Mexican descent).

The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce will honor Cypress Hill with the 2,660th star on the famous sidewalk.

“We are proud to honor the first Latino American hip-hop recording group,” said Ana Martinez, producer of the Hollywood Walk of Fame. “They have been successful as a group for three decades and we know they will continue their success for many years to come.”

The unveiling will take place on Thursday, April 18 in front of Green Leaf Restaurant at Eastown. George Lopez and Xzibit will help with the induction ceremony.

Cypress Hill was the first Latino American hip hop recording group to have platinum and multi-platinum albums, selling over 20 million albums worldwide. They are considered to be among the main progenitors of West Coast rap and hip hop in the early 1990s, being critically acclaimed for their first four albums. They are known for their classic singles “How I Could Just Kill a Man,” “I Ain’t Goin’ Out Like That,” “Throw Your Set in the Air,” “Rap Superstar,” and many more,

The band has also advocated for medical and recreational use of cannabis in the United States.

The Grammy-nominated group, originally from Southern California, recently released their ninth studio album, “Elephants on Acid.”

The post Cypress Hill to Receive Star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame appeared first on The Source.

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Smashing Heavy!

Smashing Heavy!


Source: Cypress Hill On Facebook

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